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Is anyone out there using E30 fuel? Or does anyone know if using E30 is safe for the car?
I ran Map 3 with e30 on my JB4 this summer for a month or so. Car ran amazing and was noticeably faster than Map 2 with 93. I switched back to 93 and Map 2 when it started to get cold out and traction became an issue.
You won't find a conclusive answer to "is it safe for the car", some people say yes and others say no. I'm pretty sure the one dude I talked to at Raptors vs. the Dragon said he had been running e30 and meth with a special tune for months with no issues?
Now that there is a higher pressure fuel pump available it is possible that in the future someone will figure it out and possibly release a kit with the appropriate hoses to run e30 or even e85?
 

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No, E30 is not safe for the engine. It will greatly shorten the life of the engine seals. will cause a loss of warranty. Max ethanol you can utilize is 15%. Checking for the right level of ethanol is a 10 minute process.
I'd be utilizing water injection, long before meth or anything greater the 15% Ethanol fuel. However, to answer your question directly; no the engine is not engineered to handle e85 or e30.
 

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Chalk White 2020 Veloster N w/PP
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Cars like my 2011 Gen Coupe are fine with E10. Newer cars can use E15. Of course flex fuel cars can use a much higher percentage of ethanol by design. I would not go above E15. Given the lower energy content you will get a lower mpg and probably less horsepower. I will note that my Vibe GT had a 91 octane requirement, but I was able to run 89 octane E10 without pinging.
 

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When you're stock, If you do the math, in theory, your fuel trims can richen up your mix and make E30 safe to run and you won't get a CEL. But you don't want to get on the loud pedal for at least 30 miles when you first fill up to let the fuel trims adjust. Your trims will run real high probably around +20.

There's just not a reason to. Your gas mileage will be worse. On 91 your timing will max out on stock tune. The reason E85 + a tune gives you more power is that you can run a LOT more timing and your engine won't predet. E30 on the stock tune won't predet and will run max stock timing. But on the stock tune on 91 you wont predet at max stock timing and it's the safer way to go.

To run E85 on this engine will take more than just a tune. From what I read, you need a fuel pump, possibly a HPFP and injectors. To maintain the proper AFR (IIRC the AFR of E85 is just over 9) you need to flow about 30% more fuel. The energy density of E85 is less than gasoline. Ethanol has better anti-knock characteristics than gasoline. Ethanol also has better combustion chamber cooling. Neither of these is an issue with this car.

MAybe it sounds better? I think you'll get less pops and bangs though. I ran retarded low load timing on my FRS. On gas, it popped and banged like crazy. On E85 it didn't at all.

It will probably smell better even with cats. I can't think of another reason to run E30.
 

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That might be true, but E30 is not recommended by the manufacturer. I try to stick with what their engineer's recommend.
 
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So let me tell say this e30 is perfect safe to run.. I daily drive my car on e30 ( 87 miles a day ) and runs fine . It’s going to depend on your tune .. I have gone as high as 60/40 e85/93 and it caused a misfire and a bank lean code .. 50/50 is the max before the lpfp can’t keep up..

I know they say it will dry out seals and the fuel lines but in all honesty the jump from 10% to 30% is so minor most people won’t own the car long enough for something like a seal to wear out..

So in closing our cars have a 12 gallon tank I tend to do 4 gallons e85 and 6-7 gallons 93 depending on how low i ran the tank before filling up ..
 

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I know they say it will dry out seals and the fuel lines but in all honesty the jump from 10% to 30% is so minor most people won’t own the car long enough for something like a seal to wear out..
~85% ethanol and ~30% gasoline are exponential jumps in alcohol content. The long term use is the issue and is widely understood. The LPFP and HPFP aren't the issue either but the seals and lubrication in both as well. They won't take the constant use over a long period of time. Then there's the individual owners warranty to consider. Running anything beyond 15% ethanol blend, is a big no with the dealership and manufacturer. Such damage can happen in a little as 35K or less which is not uncommon.
Ethanol has a corrosive action on fuel-system components, magnesium, aluminium and rubber. e85 has a short storage and tank life, because its prone to absorb moisture from the air. It also means that depending on how long the gas stays in your tank or the humidity level of your geographic area, you can experience poor performance and even problems with fuel injectors. Due to its ethanol component, it's more likely to ignite before the piston compresses (predetonation) and the spark plug does its job.

Due to its corrosive nature and as we mentioned here before... E85 affects fuel system components, magnesium, aluminium, rubber hoses, gaskets and paper fuel filters. Another important detail to factor in is that the fuel pump usually has gas flowing around the pump and motor mechanism that lubricates it. This isn't the case of E85 fuels, because they lack this important lubrication component. The electric fuel pump can fail sooner than normal due to this lack of lubrication plus the fact that it's working harder to pump 20-30% more fuel for the same travel distance.
So your car might run on E85 – it's simply not going to run well. It could also cause major damage, and using E85 in vehicles not equipped for E85 usually voids your warranty. So that's why you should not try it.
There is tons of information regarding the use of e30 and e85. Most, simply state in the beginning, "DON"T DO IT!"

Here's another minor reason not to utilize it;


Dealerships have, "Fuel Composition Testers" and regularly utilize them. Fuel/Alcohol content, can be tested in less time it takes to get the tool out of their tool box.
 
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