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Hey guys,

So recently with all the snow in my area, I've been driving my Veloster N through a lot of wet conditions, and have noticed pretty bad delays, especially on highways, between when I hit the brake pedal and when my brakes actually start to grab and slow the car down. Initially, I didn't think much of it, but recently upon pushing the brake pedal, this same behavior occurred except the car pulled to one side and almost sent me directly into the divider.

I did some reading on this in the forums/Facebook group and found that this occurs with the Veloster because the brake pad material reduces its ability to remove water from the rotor/pads and causes a delay in how quickly it can start slowing the car down. And in some cases, if one side drys before the other, it will pull the car in one direction, which is what happened to me the other day.

Now I get that this is a performance car and these brakes were built with the track in mind. But, at the end of the day, this is still a streetcar, and it seems ridiculous to me that a streetcar has a safety issue such as this on rainy days. From what I read, it appears swapping the pads to any other aftermarket performance pads completely alleviates this issue.

So with that in mind, is this a common side effect of performance brakes, or is this an issue specific to these Hyundai brakes? And if it's the latter, isn't this something Hyundai should take responsibility for? Cause at this point, I feel very uncomfortable driving my car in any sort of wet condition.

Sorry about the rant, thanks for the help
 

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Eh... Maybe? The same could be said for the Pirelli P-Zero Ultra High Performance stock tires that are not supposed to be used below 45 degrees Fahrenheit. They will actual void the tire warranty when used below that temperature and can develop cracks due to the compound.

All I could suggest is to swap out the parts for others that are meant for colder temperatures.

-Sam
 

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All you have to do is gently ride the brake occasionally to remove the water from the surface of the rotor, in heavy rain or wet icy conditions. A permanent fix is to change the rotors to this;
The rotors are the primary problem. There is no way to channel off the water, which causes a hydroplaning effect when they're first applies. The pads are metallic and don't hold water. Learn to utilize the hand brake as well to remove water from the rear rotors. Drilled and slotted rotors will remedy the issue.
 

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Chalk White 2020 Veloster N w/PP
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Interesting. A couple of cars ago mine did exactly this in a heavy rain. I got used to a quick pump which would clear the brakes. Nevertheless, this was a safety issue. Any car intended for street use must have brakes that work properly in all conditions...like a panic stop in the rain...duh. I have not noticed this with my VN before. It is up on jack stands right now, but I have driven in the rain before and it seemed fine. I will take heed of this, however.
 
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Eh... Maybe? The same could be said for the Pirelli P-Zero Ultra High Performance stock tires that are not supposed to be used below 45 degrees Fahrenheit. They will actual void the tire warranty when used below that temperature and can develop cracks due to the compound.
Which really makes you feel great with all the Veloster N's sitting on dealer lots in the Northern states. Mine was in the showroom, but I bet it wasn't in there the entire time.
 

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I live in SoCal, so I didn’t experience this wet issue for a while. When I finally did get in the rain, my brakes were almost non-functional. It’s the stock Brembo pad. Once I got my new EBC Yellowstuff pads, brakes worked great in the rain!
 
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