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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)

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No, I got a factory one. I made sure it is in spec. after the install. It was off a little bit and the steering wheel wasn't centered. It is now and the thing is even better than before. I have absolutely no complaints. One of the best cars I have owned so far!

Br,

-Mike
Steering wheel can be adjusted by means of a special wrench and alignment tool designed to level and recenter the steering wheel. If they realign the wheels and the steering wheel is off, always make them realign the steering wheel.

Wrench holds the steering column in place and the Alignment Tool is placed upon the steering wheel. Put the wrench on the steering column and loosen it loosen it, align the steering wheel with the leveling tool, retighten the column and you're done. Takes about 10 minutes to do it right. Doesn't effect the alignment of the wheels.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Steering wheel can be adjusted by means of a special wrench and alignment tool designed to level and recenter the steering wheel. If they realign the wheels and the steering wheel is off, always make them realign the steering wheel.

Wrench holds the steering column in place and the Alignment Tool is placed upon the steering wheel. Put the wrench on the steering column and loosen it loosen it, align the steering wheel with the leveling tool, retighten the column and you're done. Takes about 10 minutes to do it right. Doesn't effect the alignment of the wheels.:smile:
Thank you, Sir! Great info!

Br,

-Mike
 

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If you live in a salted road area keep an eye on them. They design them to crush and it breaks the corrosion barrier of the anodizing and then they corrode and when they corrode in place they do it in a serious way. Since they're a tight fit on both the bolt/stud and into the subframe they will lock the two together bad enough you will really regret installing them in a few years if you have to remove it.



Really, the manufacturer designs the subframe to be held in place by the friction between the subframe and the unibody. The bolt is only there to provide clamp force, not to take any shear load. Keeping the bolt from sliding sideways in the hole would only help if the bolt came loose enough to allow the subframe to shift around under load, and then there would be bigger problems anyway, like subframe bolts shearing off from being side loaded.



Rigid collars do have a use though, and that's on cars with rubber isolated subframes. On those cars they work wonders and make the car as rigid as ours is with it's factory metal to metal mounting. I run delrin collars with a steel center sleeve on the rear subframe on my Supra and it made a massive unmistakable difference (it also made the car a lot louder inside because you could then hear every gear tooth in the driveline). They don't fit tightly over the subframe studs though, they rely on the clamp load on the sleeve to take the side loading the same as the stock VN subframe mounts do.
 

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The aluminum will not corrode or react to the steel even if the anodizing is compromised. The shearing that exists with the steel subframe and unibody is quite prevalent after years of use, as was on the previous gen Veloster. Both subframe and unibody connecting points are smoothly mounted against one another and the bolt holes are oversized as well. The clamping strength diminishes over a period of time and no matter how much you torque down the bolts, it will make not reduce the shifting between the two.

Once the collars are installed they won't need to be removed for any reason. Utilization of these collars, will complete diminish the issue without future issues or problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
The aluminum will not corrode or react to the steel even if the anodizing is compromised. The shearing that exists with the steel subframe and unibody is quite prevalent after years of use, as was on the previous gen Veloster. Both subframe and unibody connecting points are smoothly mounted against one another and the bolt holes are oversized as well. The clamping strength diminishes over a period of time and no matter how much you torque down the bolts, it will make not reduce the shifting between the two.

Once the collars are installed they won't need to be removed for any reason. Utilization of these collars, will complete diminish the issue without future issues or problems.
I would have to agree with this. I know a ton of people with these and they have never had a problem. The only way I can see removing them is if you had to replace something in an accident. The bottom line is there is way more pro's with the collars than cons. I am glad I did these to my N. Made a nice difference.

Br,

-Mike
 
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I used the pinch welds to lift the car. There are re-inforced pinch welds in the front of the rocker panel behind the front tire and in back in front of the rear tires. I have to say, the pinch welds on this car are the strongest ones I have ever seen.
-Mike
Hey Mike,
Back to jacking and jack stands. I too noticed how strong the pinch welds were on this car when changing out to winter tires. I never did see a place I felt comfortable putting a jack stand. I just shoved an old tire/wheel under the car and kept it on the jack. Did you find a spot for the jack stand or just leave the car on the jack and work corner to corner? Thanks for the write up of the collars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
Hey Mike,
Back to jacking and jack stands. I too noticed how strong the pinch welds were on this car when changing out to winter tires. I never did see a place I felt comfortable putting a jack stand. I just shoved an old tire/wheel under the car and kept it on the jack. Did you find a spot for the jack stand or just leave the car on the jack and work corner to corner? Thanks for the write up of the collars.

I put a rag on where the jack stand would hit the pinch weld. I used the flattest part on the jack stand itself too. The pinch welds are really strong. If you look under the car right behind the front tire you will see a section of pinch weld that is about 4" long that has a bolt on each side, I put my jack stands there right in between the 2 bolts. It's the same in front of the rear tires. To view them you have to look from under the car looking towards the rocker. I also keep equal pressure on both the stand and the jack. This will save any potential pinch weld damage. I hope I explained it ok?

Best regards,

-Mike
 
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There are actually jack stand guards available on eBay for the pinch type points.
Hey Mike,
Back to jacking and jack stands. I too noticed how strong the pinch welds were on this car when changing out to winter tires. I never did see a place I felt comfortable putting a jack stand. I just shoved an old tire/wheel under the car and kept it on the jack. Did you find a spot for the jack stand or just leave the car on the jack and work corner to corner? Thanks for the write up of the collars.
You can actually utilize the control arms near the bolt holes with a rubber puck between the jack and the arm.
 

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I just got my rigid collars in the mail and I'll be installing them within the next couple days. I'm curious to see how the installation goes. Unfortunately I'm doing a number of other suspension modifications at the same time so I won't know if the collars are doing anything but I'm ok with that. For $70, I'm not especially concerned if they do or don't do anything. They won't realistically cause any problems so whatever.
 

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I had a Genesis Coupe and did rigid collars on that car. Wow, what a difference it made. I was very skeptical but the online community was big on them so I got them. This car is already very tight and has no slop, so I'm not sure if I'll do it. But on the GC, they made a big difference
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
It did make a difference. And for I think 68 bucks at the time I just couldn't resist. Even know the car is tight, the dampers on the shocks make it that way. Trust me when I tell you, when I removed one of the subframe bolts you had so much room to jiggle the bolt in the hole. When the collars are installed all the bolt slop is gone. It's a cheap effective suspension mod.

-Br

-Mike
 
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So my car is still up in air awaiting re-installation of its front control arms but I installed the collars last night and I thought I'd share some observations.

First, Ghost's writeup in the first post is dead-on. No guesswork needed if you just follow his directions.

All of the subframe nuts/bolts were very tight but the fronts were relatively easy to loosen. A breaker bar or a few ugga-duggas and they'll come loose no problem. The rear subframe however was tightened by very strong and very angry robots. The front bolts of the rear subframe could be loosened by my air impact after a bit. The rearmost however, neither my electric nor air impact could make a dent. I eventually had to use a breaker bar with a pipe extension for more torque. And listen, I'm a 255lb weight lifter and I still struggled. I was scared I would shear the stud off before that damned nut would break loose.

Speaking of that rearmost nut, it's on a very long stud that's only partially threaded. Buying a super long 19mm socket like Ghost did is the easy, non-destructive solution but I already had a Dremel with heavy duty cutting wheels so I just cut off the non-threaded portion. 5 minutes per side and done, no big deal. As always, when using a high speed spinning tool, wear eye protection.

My front subframe was definitely mis-aligned. I had to loosen all four bolts and use my hands and knees to shift the whole thing over and back before I could get all 4 collars into place. This illustrates that the subframe is held in place only by clamping force and not interference from solid material. So, especially if you have sticky tires, an aggressive alignment, control arm bushings, etc, the subframe could definitely be pushed around. The collars will prevent that.

When putting the collars in the rear subframe, the fronts popped right in easily. The rearmost subframes holes however are more of an oval-shaped slot and the collars have to basically be smashed in there by tightening the nuts. The right side went in without drama although it's definitely never coming out without some serious persuasion. The drive side however, I could only get the collar about halfway down into the subframe hole before I was afraid the required torque was going to start stripping threads off the stud. I think it'll be fine as the collar is in far enough that the subframe can't move laterally and I torqued the nut to probably 100ft/lbs before I chickened out.

I'll post driving impressions when my car is back together and aligned, whenever that may be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Nice to have a fellow weight lifter in the house!! Woot, Woot!!! I think you'll be fine too but remember the nut that came off the back was at least torqued to 130 ft lbs if not more. I'd tighten it up more. I think I tightened up the rear nut to at least 130 on my car. I used a torque wrench on all the bolts.

My car really needed an alignment after I installed mine. Once it's done you'll notice an even better difference. I am so glad I did mine. Thanks for the positive words too Al. :)

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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I neglected to mention I used a torque wrench on all fasteners and took them to 130. That last one that's only partially in, eh. I'm leaving it where it is. I'm afraid it'll strip the stud if I crank on it any harder.
 

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I made a lot of suspension/chassis changes all at once so I can't isolate the effect of the bushings but my car is transformed. I did SuperPro bushings on all 4 pivot points of the front control arms, had the control arms boxed in with plates on the bottom, installed the rigid collars and got a good alignment. Steering is amazingly responsive and immediate, fast corners feel much more confident and stable and there's not added harshness or noise that I can detect. So, overall a huge win.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Any pics, Al? Really like to see the boxed in plates. Thanks in advance.

Br,

-Mike
 
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