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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to gather information in regards to tuning requirements and modifications for the 20 VN. I’m new to the Hyundai platform as a consumer. I am a expert advisor certified with Hyundai, so I am familiar with Hyundai in an OEM standpoint where I’ve seen my fair share of stock engines grenade themselves. My familiarity with Subaru though tells me you need to tune for nearly anything.

The main question is, is tuning required for items like intakes, exhaust, BOV, etc? Not that I mind having to do so, but mainly managing if or when I should do a certain modification. All insight and direction is greatly appreciated
 

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https://www.velostern.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=357&d=1558132682

I'm a bit surprised being an; Hyundai Certified Expert Service Advisor, you aren't familiar with the Hyundai Assurance Track Warranty and allowable modifications.

Those stock engines that were grenading themselves, were the original 1.6 T Gamma 1st Gen and the 2.0 Theta II engines. This was caused by metal tags left on during the milling process. It's costing Hyundai over 3 billion to right the issues. Also, a mandatory upgrade of the knock detection systemThen breaking off and ending up in the crankcase and destroying crank and rod bearings.

No, you do not need to tune for; intake, exhaust, downpipe, BOV excluded. A BOV doesn't impact power development of the motor. However, if you expect to find the optimal performance for these specific modifications you tune.

Try utilizing the search engine at the top right hand of the page. It will help you find on going, relevant topics of discussion and answers to your questions.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
https://www.velostern.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=357&d=1558132682

I'm a bit surprised being an; Hyundai Certified Expert Service Advisor, you aren't familiar with the Hyundai Assurance Track Warranty and allowable modifications.

Those stock engines that were grenading themselves, were the original 1.6 T Gamma 1st Gen and the 2.0 Theta II engines. This was caused by metal tags left on during the milling process. It's costing Hyundai over 3 billion to right the issues. Also, a mandatory upgrade of the knock detection systemThen breaking off and ending up in the crankcase and destroying crank and rod bearings.

No, you do not need to tune for; intake, exhaust, downpipe, BOV excluded. A BOV doesn't impact power development of the motor. However, if you expect to find the optimal performance for these specific modifications you tune.

Try utilizing the search engine at the top right hand of the page. It will help you find on going, relevant topics of discussion and answers to your questions.
Oh I’m familiar with them. The track record is primarily the 2.4 engines failure with spun bearings. I’ve been involved with 2 1.6T and a handful of 2.0t failures. Hyundai’s warranty is one of the most lenient warranties out there if approached properly. They’re covering 200k sonatas and sludged up turbos on the regular with their process. I just wanted to be sure it wasn’t like Subaru and their need for tuning because you replaced a light bulb lol. Thank you for the information though.
 

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When it comes to the N, it can adjust to some modifications up to a certain point. This has been proven on dyinos by many companies. It seems at this point the car can retune itself up to about 300 horsepower. For me that's Cat-Back exhaust, cold air intake, and FMIC. Some times I hit the torque limiter at the lower RPMs. This seems to cause the blow off valve to vent. However at some point to utilize modifications you will need to tune, or have a pigy back. If I was running a downpipe, fmic, cold air intake , cat back, I would be hitting power limitations .Maybe even throwing a check engine light.
 

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Sorry and no offense intended; but ECU's don't retune themselves. The ECU utilizes the tables and parameters its loaded with. It will only adapt within these specifications.

You'll be lucky to attain or surpass 300 whp with the OEM turbo even with an aftermarket tune. A downpipe, FMIC, Intake and catback, doesn't require tuning and will produce no where near 300 whp or come close to any torque limitations.

Done extensive dyno tuning and confirmed this numerous times. It's not the ECU is properly tune ted will it come closer to 290 whp, with the OEM turbo charger an additional intake and minor modifications and adjustments.

With the modifications you've listed above, you be somewhere around 265 whp. There are to many other changes and modifications required to bring it above 265 whp.
 

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Sorry and no offense intended; but ECU's don't retune themselves. The ECU utilizes the tables and parameters its loaded with. It will only adapt within these specifications.

You'll be lucky to attain or surpass 300 whp with the OEM turbo even with an aftermarket tune. A downpipe, FMIC, Intake and catback, doesn't require tuning and will produce no where near 300 whp or come close to any torque limitations.

Done extensive dyno tuning and confirmed this numerous times. It's not the ECU is properly tune ted will it come closer to 290 whp, with the OEM turbo charger an additional intake and minor modifications and adjustments.

With the modifications you've listed above, you be somewhere around 265 whp. There are to many other changes and modifications required to bring it above 265 whp.
I wasn't saying 300 whp

I was saying about 300 crank.
 
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