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I finished my break in! :smile:
Time to drive it like you stole it. This car loves anything above 3000 rpm's. And will pull decently. And corners we will just let N speak for it's self there. Have fun. I never use the Launch Control feature though. I engaged it a few times, but do better on my own launching it. You will notice the wheel hop between 1st and 2nd if you really get it on it. Hopefully when I get my new RMM it will help that. Also if your not already doing this I would suggest starting the car at least 5 minutes before you have to leave to get the oil a little bit up too temp. I try and it get it to normal temps before I take off from a cold start. Also in the past when I drove a turbo I would always let it idle for a minute or two after a hard run so the temps could come down. But noticed on the N that the fan will stay on after a hard run for a while when you shut the car down. I still will idle my N after a hard run though still. What's a couple of minutes anyways. But like I said enjoy the car and DRIVE DRIVE it! It will thank you with pure performance.
 

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Time to drive it like you stole it. This car loves anything above 3000 rpm's. And will pull decently. And corners we will just let N speak for it's self there. Have fun. I never use the Launch Control feature though. I engaged it a few times, but do better on my own launching it. You will notice the wheel hop between 1st and 2nd if you really get it on it. Hopefully when I get my new RMM it will help that. Also if your not already doing this I would suggest starting the car at least 5 minutes before you have to leave to get the oil a little bit up too temp. I try and it get it to normal temps before I take off from a cold start. Also in the past when I drove a turbo I would always let it idle for a minute or two after a hard run so the temps could come down. But noticed on the N that the fan will stay on after a hard run for a while when you shut the car down. I still will idle my N after a hard run though still. What's a couple of minutes anyways. But like I said enjoy the car and DRIVE DRIVE it! It will thank you with pure performance.

What he said.... This is such a fun car!!!

Br,

-Mike
 

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Time to drive it like you stole it. This car loves anything above 3000 rpm's. And will pull decently. And corners we will just let N speak for it's self there. Have fun. I never use the Launch Control feature though. I engaged it a few times, but do better on my own launching it. You will notice the wheel hop between 1st and 2nd if you really get it on it. Hopefully when I get my new RMM it will help that. Also if your not already doing this I would suggest starting the car at least 5 minutes before you have to leave to get the oil a little bit up too temp. I try and it get it to normal temps before I take off from a cold start. Also in the past when I drove a turbo I would always let it idle for a minute or two after a hard run so the temps could come down. But noticed on the N that the fan will stay on after a hard run for a while when you shut the car down. I still will idle my N after a hard run though still. What's a couple of minutes anyways. But like I said enjoy the car and DRIVE DRIVE it! It will thank you with pure performance.
Personally, I would recommend letting the car idle after a hard run regardless too, but the owner's manual also states to let the engine cool for at least a minute before shutting it off. See attached image :)
 

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Personally, I would recommend letting the car idle after a hard run regardless too, but the owner's manual also states to let the engine cool for at least a minute before shutting it off. See attached image :)
Instead of letting it sit there at idle for 5 minutes with the mix pig rich on startup, drive it like you're trying not to wake your parents up when you come home three hours past curfew till the engine and oil are warm.


Letting a GDI engine sit and idle to warm up allows for more potential for fuel dilution, and it just wastes gas. If you're not pulling hard on the turbo till it's warm, it'll be just fine. Best to warm an engine by actually driving it.


I'd say start the car, adjust seat/mirrors as needed, get your belt on, set your drive mode, that's 20-30 seconds to get the oil flowing, then drive casually till it's warm.


Then, allow mischief to ensue.


By all means, allow it to idle one to two minutes after a hard run to cool the oil/flush hot spots out of the oil galleys. Five or so minutes on a track day. But that's on a warm motor. Big difference in fuel mix.
 

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Fuel dilution depends on how much blow by there is in the cylinders, noting more or less. The VN 2.0T Theta engine is pretty darn tight.

Presently, oil testing lab results are showing less than .05 -1% oil dilution, which is considered a trace. Also, the VN is one of the first Theta II engines, to be equipped with an air/oil separator in the valve cover. The separator removes the majority of the fuel/oil vapor from the PCV system, before it's allowed to come in contact with the intake valves and then drains back into the crank case.

Warm up even in the winter for driving purposes is; 1 to 2 minutes tops, 30 seconds - 1 minute is sufficient for spring, summer and fall.
 

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Fuel dilution depends on how much blow by there is in the cylinders, noting more or less. The VN 2.0T Theta engine is pretty darn tight.

Presently, oil testing lab results are showing less than .05 -1% oil dilution, which is considered a trace. Also, the VN is one of the first Theta II engines, to be equipped with an air/oil separator in the valve cover. The separator removes the majority of the fuel/oil vapor from the PCV system, before it's allowed to come in contact with the intake valves and then drains back into the crank case.

Warm up even in the winter for driving purposes is; 1 to 2 minutes tops, 30 seconds - 1 minute is sufficient for spring, summer and fall.

Agreed. My winter procedure is to start car, turn on heated seat and defrosters, scrape the windows clear and then drive away. That's generally about two to three minutes tops.
 

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I always let my vehicles warm up from a cold start at least a minute. But I live in Florida, so it's not really that cold. I refer to this as "machine compassion".


A fuel dilution issue was definitely noted in the most recent Honda 1.5 liter turbo engines, in the CRVs, Accords, and Civics. I've not heard of a problem with Hyundai cars/SUVs. But those issues seemed to be in areas of our country where temperatures really get cold in the winter. Those Honda owners would note the oil levels going up on the dip-stick when the oil level was checked, and a strong smell of gasoline in the oil. But, it turned out not to be increased oil levels, but fuel being dumped into the cylinders and making its way into the oil pan, diluting the engine oil with gasoline. It is my understanding that Honda had a fix for it. Honda did a fuel reprograming, and all is good, (according to Honda). Of course, I would wonder if the car's owners would have premature oil usage, loss of compression, or early crankshaft bearing failure, miles down the road. Again, referring to Honda 1.5 liter turbo engines, and not other manufacturers.
 

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I always let my vehicles warm up from a cold start at least a minute. But I live in Florida, so it's not really that cold. I refer to this as "machine compassion".


A fuel dilution issue was definitely noted in the most recent Honda 1.5 liter turbo engines, in the CRVs, Accords, and Civics. I've not heard of a problem with Hyundai cars/SUVs. But those issues seemed to be in areas of our country where temperatures really get cold in the winter. Those Honda owners would note the oil levels going up on the dip-stick when the oil level was checked, and a strong smell of gasoline in the oil. But, it turned out not to be increased oil levels, but fuel being dumped into the cylinders and making its way into the oil pan, diluting the engine oil with gasoline. It is my understanding that Honda had a fix for it. Honda did a fuel reprograming, and all is good, (according to Honda). Of course, I would wonder if the car's owners would have premature oil usage, loss of compression, or early crankshaft bearing failure, miles down the road. Again, referring to Honda 1.5 liter turbo engines, and not other manufacturers.

I'm not an expert mechanic by any means, and I know that even the best sealed rings have a small amount of blow by, but I fail to understand how a computer remap can "fix" a blow by issue.
 
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