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Discussion Starter #1
I'm coming from an NA motor in the last car, the 3.5L in the honda accord. That motor kicked some serious butt, famously underrated on paper at 278 but making closer to 300. Your prototype NA V6 feel. So the N is my first FI car ever. I'm not used to boost, and I'm definitely not used to max torque at a low 1600 rpm. The honda reached max at around 55ish.



So I saw a post awhile back, on an oil change thread, that mentioned lugging the engine. An rpm range was given, somewhere between 1500 and 2000.


I know what lugging the engine is...Ive owned one slushbox in my life and sold it after 40k miles, I'm the poster child for save the manuals...


But drivability wise, once the car is broken in, should I stay out of that lower range if I plan on flooring the car? If I know I want to jam on the next corner ahead, should I be in a higher rpm range, even with max torque down so low? Is is possible to lug the engine by flooring it at 2K?



Going FI is going to be a big change, especially coming from the 3.5L. Still trying to adjust and know some of you all will have some good advice. Preesh!
 

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Run top tier fuel. 91 plus octane minimum and keep the fuel injectors clean by utilizing Chevron Techron once ever 1500 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Never boost in high gears at low rpm's. Look up what Low Speed Pre Ignition is; It's the number one killer of tgdi cars.

Oh ****, ok...I'll make sure I don't do that! However, second? Third? Ok to feel that torque down low in those two gears?


Run top tier fuel. 91 plus octane minimum and keep the fuel injectors clean by utilizing Chevron Techron once ever 1500 miles.

The next fillup at costco I'll put some in.
 

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Maybe next gen N can give us factory boost by gear/rpm settings. Not that it accomplishes anything your right foot can't but the more adjustability the better!
 

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In my previous turbo car, I used Shell V Power 91 as recommend by my tuner. Never had an issue with dirty injectors. Also, I try fill up at a high traffic gas station. Even with that, I still got a bad tank of gas several times a year. Easily fixed with a bottle of Lucas Octane Booster. :D
 

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Obviously if you're doing 50mph and in 6th, a down shift to 3rd or 4th is in order if you want to floor it.

This car rides so high in the rpm in 6th on the highway I rarely need to shift.

If you're "lugging" the car, you're obviously looking for mpg at that point and flooring it probably isn't on your mind...and if it is...don't be lazy, donwshift.
 

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In my previous turbo car, I used Shell V Power 91 as recommended by my tuner. Never had an issue with dirty injectors. Also, I try fill up at a high traffic gas station. Even with that, I still got a bad tank of gas several times a year. Easily fixed with a bottle of Lucas Octane Booster. :D
Most likely, you ran it out of the system. Octane booster wouldn't help. To eliminate water in the fuel system, you use Dry Gas (HEET) and other such products. It's methyl or isopropyl based and can also be a denatured fuel ethanol.

https://www3.epa.gov/otaq/fuels1/ffars/web-gas.htm

This^ link will provide you will all the current gasoline additives approved on the market today. It's difficult to get water in the fuel now a days simply because of the newer tank systems utilized in filling stations. They have filtration system at the pumps, as well as water seperators in the tanks. Stay away from older stations and you'll generally be fine. Don't fill up, if you see a tanker truck at the station refilling the tanks, go to another.

You'll find more problems with water or condensation in older fuel system in higher humidity climates, especially with snow and rainy conditions. Older model vehicles, are more susceptible to water or condensation in the fuel system They utilize a lower pressure FI systems. Today, most GDI's are equipped with very high pressure FI systems. Older model vehicles utilize galvanized fuel tanks. Today most utilize plastic tanks.

With freezing and thawing conditions, condensation in fuel systems can form in the tank, This is where products like HEET com into play. They literally remove the water from the system by; making the alcohol and water molecules combine and are then burned away during combustion.
 

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As was said above, the car will be fine cruising at low RPM, but if you want to accelerate, downshift. Pick a gear depending on how fast you want to accelerate.


You want to let the turbo do the work. Downshifting spools the turbo up and brings the power on tap nice and fast, and it puts much less strain on the engine.


If you're going from 50 to 60, as long as you do it gently, you don't need to downshift. If you're doing 50 and want to pass a slow moving car on a 60mph road, drop it to third and punch it. You'll be past the slow poke in a heartbeat, then you can drop it back in 6th, hit resume on the cruise control, and continue on your merry way.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As was said above, the car will be fine cruising at low RPM, but if you want to accelerate, downshift. Pick a gear depending on how fast you want to accelerate.


You want to let the turbo do the work. Downshifting spools the turbo up and brings the power on tap nice and fast, and it puts much less strain on the engine.


If you're going from 50 to 60, as long as you do it gently, you don't need to downshift. If you're doing 50 and want to pass a slow moving car on a 60mph road, drop it to third and punch it. You'll be past the slow poke in a heartbeat, then you can drop it back in 6th, hit resume on the cruise control, and continue on your merry way.

Yep all good info! I'm learning a little more each day and having a blast..
 

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I agree with what all these other folks say about flooring it at low revs. When I owned my 2016 WRX, I was told to never floor it under 3000 rpms. I get it. That's been my rule of thumb, never floor it under 3000 on a gasoline turbo vehicle with a manual transmission...of course with an automatic, it would downshift on its own.
 

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I agree with what all these other folks say about flooring it at low revs. When I owned my 2016 WRX, I was told to never floor it under 3000 rpms. I get it. That's been my rule of thumb, never floor it under 3000 on a gasoline turbo vehicle with a manual transmission...of course with an automatic, it would downshift on its own.

A sporty turbocharged car with an automatic is just a sad thing though.
(DCT is not an automatic though, it's an automated manual. All the advantages of a manual transmission, all the advantages of an automatic for those who don't enjoy shifting, with the minimal drawback of losing that satisfaction of pulling off a smooth, efficient shift).


I drive a DCT equipped Focus daily for work. It's by no means bad, shifts well and I pick that car because it's got guts to pass on two lane blacktops over our other fleet cars (a handful of 2019 EcoSports, gutless wonders that get worse MPG than the 7 year old Focus), and a couple of tried and true Pontiac Vibes (rebadged Toyota Matrixes, booooorrrrrrrrriiiiiinnnnngggggg).


No complaints about the DCT. There's one curve I take on my way back from Grand Rapids, MN every Tuesday and Friday that (provided there's no snow/ice on the ground) I can click the car into manual, drop it into 3rd, and apex the corner at 50mph with no tire squeal, no under or oversteer, and be back on the gas up to 65mph where I can pop it back into Drive and hit resume on the cruise. I can probably go faster, but I am driving a billboard, so I choose to keep it fast without looking fast if you catch my drift. I feel that turn would be more fun with a double clutched downshift and a little heel toe work to set the corner up/drive through it through the curve (and I've done it in my RSX, it is more fun that way), but I can't even really call it a complaint. It is mildly nice to not have to work the clutch the rare occasion I'm in stop and go traffic, but I still prefer the feel of a manual even though a DCT is on paper superior.
 
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