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2019 Veloster N PP / MT / Perf Blue.
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587 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The previous week I wanted to focus solely on the comfort settings using the RIDE button for the Front and Rear on the Mando unit.

For me - the way to understand the car and what it does and how it is setup is to take it to extremes.

I started by taking the RIDE Front to 50 and the Ride Rear to 0.

I drove the same 4 mile course for a total of 30 minutes per each Mando Setting. The setting was urban Dallas city streets, mixed pavements, assortments of various hole sizes, and a few Dart (train) rails.

Tire pressures were 32/34 to begin and I started the test w/ pressures at 35/37.

So what happened with Front 50 and Rear 0. It did what I expected which was totally uncomfortable. I felt every bump and undulation. The front was so stiff that I felt all the sensations in front of me. I felt it in my feet, hips, teeth, chest. Driving with it at that setting was not enjoyable and not recommended for city driving. In actually produced quite a but of anxiety. At no point was I able to zone out and be unaware of the sensations delivered.

The whole experience was disharmonious.

Now - what about with Front Ride at 0 and Rear Ride at 50. One would expect the ride to be just as jarring but it was not. I believe that is because all of the sensations are happening behind you and therefore not as bad. The ride was not enjoyable by any means still, but way more tolerable. In this scenario you are not gritting your teeth when approaching a bump or pothole because you know the Front will be soft and supple and the Rear firm.

This confirms my initial thoughts in a previous post that the rear needs more damping than the front for comfort. As you know - I previously suggested that the rear spring rate for the rear would be lower than the front, but some of our members informed me that rear rate is actually higher than the front which lead me to more thoughts for future tests and posts. Those will be explained later this week.

So, while I was wrong in my previous assumption I am still on track that for comfort driving the rear needs more damping. This was proven subjectively over the same road course at 2 various settings for 30 minutes of driving per setting.

In part 2 I will go in depth over all the various scenarios I used to find the most optimal setting since I had now established the Rear needs more damping than the front.

The test for part 2 was over an hour and a half on the same road course the following day with various ratios of Front to Rear Damping.

I look forward to sharing those findings with you all tomorrow.

Blessings,
-JE
 

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I haven't tested for comfort nearly as much as you have, but I seem to have settled at F/R being pretty close. I'm certainly interested to hear what you come up and to try your preferred ratio.

Overall I found the biggest comfort improvement from the ECS10 came from being able to set lower speed damping at ~medium soft, to handle the rough north eastern city streets, and highway speed damping at medium/medium stiff (in my custom mode for "comfort").

While I generally agree with you that front stiff/rear soft setting combos on the ECS10 don't feel good, the rear spring rate being stiffer than the front does not necessarily mean that the rear damping should be stiffer than the front, at least not in terms of absolute engineering units. But of course the ECS10 only gives us percentages, so who knows what the actual damping coefficients are!
 

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Registered
2019 Veloster N PP / MT / Perf Blue.
Joined
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587 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I haven't tested for comfort nearly as much as you have, but I seem to have settled at F/R being pretty close. I'm certainly interested to hear what you come up and to try your preferred ratio.

Overall I found the biggest comfort improvement from the ECS10 came from being able to set lower speed damping at ~medium soft, to handle the rough north eastern city streets, and highway speed damping at medium/medium stiff (in my custom mode for "comfort").

While I generally agree with you that front stiff/rear soft setting combos on the ECS10 don't feel good, the rear spring rate being stiffer than the front does not necessarily mean that the rear damping should be stiffer than the front, at least not in terms of absolute engineering units. But of course the ECS10 only gives us percentages, so who knows what the actual damping coefficients are!
Thank you for taking time to reply. If you haven't read my original post please do. Here is the link. I've read many of your posts on here and I greatly appreciate them all and learning from you.

MANDO ECS 1O UNIT REVIEW

"While I generally agree with you that front stiff/rear soft setting combos on the ECS10 don't feel good, the rear spring rate being stiffer than the front does not necessarily mean that the rear damping should be stiffer than the front, at least not in terms of absolute engineering units."

I agree with this statement. My experience is that the rear needs more damping than the front to create a more flat ride.

-JE
 
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