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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I took my 21 veloster n to get an oil change and tire rotation yesterday. Also got an alignment done since one was never done on the car. I’m currently at 16k miles with the stock pirellis still going somewhat strong. Prior to taking the car in, I noticed the rear tires had a lot of wear. They’re both at about 4/32’s of tread depth. The front two tires are both a bit higher, around 6/32’s of tread depth. After getting my car back from the dealership, they had swapped the more worn rear tires with the front tires. Should I have them put the less worn tires on the front since this is a FWD car or should I just leave it and rotate again at my next oil change if the front tires don’t continue to wear more (which I’m sure they will on the front). I’m debating just getting a new set of tires, but it feels a bit too early to have to get new tires considering I have two tires that are basically brand new. Any guidance would be appreciated! Thank you!

I can provide pictures if needed, but there doesn’t seem to be an issue with alignment or wear of that kind. Aside from the fact that two of the tires on the same axel are a lot more worn than the other two.
 

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Chalk White 2020 Veloster N w/PP 6MT
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A FWD drive with the rear tires wearing more? I would think you would shred the fronts long before the rear tires. I rotate between my OEM Pirelli's and my 18" Rial rims with Michelin Pilot all seasons due to temperatures and the possibility of snow. I use a tire depth gauge when I rotate to put the tires with the most tread depth up front. That certainly seems the most logical. My Genesis Coupe was RWD and ate the rear tires faster than the front tires as expected. I think the dealer was helping you out so that your tire set would wear longer.

This is an interesting and very useful observation for the group. Seems counter-intuitive, so now I should take my tire depth before and after I swap to see if I experience the same behavior.
 
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I have no VN-specific experience, but all the FWD cars I've owned wore the fronts faster than the rears. A few thoughts:
1. If you bought your car pre-owned, is it possible the previous owner swapped the fronts with the rears?
2. Could the tires have been swapped during a prior visit to the dealer or some other shop without your knowing?
3. When they realigned the car, did they give you the actual alignment values that existed prior to realingment? If so, look for any values that might have been drastically out of spec on the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have no VN-specific experience, but all the FWD cars I've owned wore the fronts faster than the rears. A few thoughts:
1. If you bought your car pre-owned, is it possible the previous owner swapped the fronts with the rears?
2. Could the tires have been swapped during a prior visit to the dealer or some other shop without your knowing?
3. When they realigned the car, did they give you the actual alignment values that existed prior to realingment? If so, look for any values that might have been drastically out of spec on the rear.
1) Looking at the carfax history, I don't see any tires rotations prior to me getting the car so I'm going to assume the previous owner just never did a tire rotation. I'm only seeing oil and filter changes for the first 10k miles.
2) I have gotten two oil changes and tire rotations done since owning the car so the first one took the more worn front tires and moved them to the rear. Now after the second one, the more worn tires that were put on the rear are back on the front.
3) They didn't give me any alignment values. I'll def ask next time I get an alignment done. Thanks for this advice.

A FWD drive with the rear tires wearing more? I would think you would shred the fronts long before the rear tires. I rotate between my OEM Pirelli's and my 18" Rial rims with Michelin Pilot all seasons due to temperatures and the possibility of snow. I use a tire depth gauge when I rotate to put the tires with the most tread depth up front. That certainly seems the most logical. My Genesis Coupe was RWD and ate the rear tires faster than the front tires as expected. I think the dealer was helping you out so that your tire set would wear longer.

This is an interesting and very useful observation for the group. Seems counter-intuitive, so now I should take my tire depth before and after I swap to see if I experience the same behavior.
Wondering if I should have them swap the tires back or if I should leave it for a bit and justkeep an eye on the tread depth? I am reading everywhere that you should keep your less worn tires on the rear, especially when dealing with wet conditions as it maintains more stability. Want to get the most out of the P Zeros before I spend an arm and a leg on new tires and wheels (Want to eventually go down to 18s and get better wheels).
 

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Chalk White 2020 Veloster N w/PP 6MT
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I am thinking the less worn tires should go on the front for the same reason. That is just an educated guess and nothing more, so I am curious if there is any more information on this? Not disagreeing, but I am always open to learning something new.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tire rotations are generally done in this manner; both fronts to the back and the rears on the same side. Front and rear on opponent sides. If it wasn’t done in this fashion there will be excessive wear on one set ( two tires).👍🇺🇸

Yeah I'm fairly this is how it was done, just wondering if I should leave it or move the more worn tires back to the rear for a bit longer?
 

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20 VN PP MT Perf. Blue, 22 KN Sonic Blue
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1) Looking at the carfax history, I don't see any tires rotations prior to me getting the car so I'm going to assume the previous owner just never did a tire rotation. I'm only seeing oil and filter changes for the first 10k miles.
It’s quite likely that whoever sold it did the tire rotation and didn’t record it or that the previous owner did the rotations him/herself. It’s not a hard thing to do and it wouldn’t surprise me if it never got recorded. I would switch the worn tires back to the back.

edit: I meant to say it isn’t a hard thing to do, but accidentally said it isn’t a simple thing to do 😅
 

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It’s quite likely that whoever sold it did the tire rotation and didn’t record it or that the previous owner did the rotations him/herself. It’s not a hard thing to do and it wouldn’t surprise me if it never got recorded. I would switch the worn tires back to the back.

edit: I meant to say it isn’t a hard thing to do, but accidentally said it isn’t a simple thing to do 😅
Volvo doesnt recommend rotating tires. You just wear out your fronts, then replace. The rears will last a long time with front drive. This doesn't work very well if you regularly drive long distance on cross sloped highways, but hopefully you're not doing that to your VN. In that case, you might prefer the cross swap rotation (non-directional tire.) I personally rotate every 4-5k back to front, so tires wear evenly, then replace all 4 at once when I feel a drop in performance.
 
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