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2020 Veloster N
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got back from a test-drive after installing a JBR short-shifter and both solid bushing sets (shifter base & trans cable bracket), and I have some thoughts on the mod itself, as well as the installation.

Does it actually shorten the throws? Yes; it's noticeably shorter without the vagueness you normally get in a short-shifter.

Is shifting more positive? Yes; there is no slop, and the mechanism physically feels heavier to move around. Shifting is now heavy enough, it makes me wish the shifter knob was weighted.

Were they any negatives? Sixth gear has a noticeable notch you need to push past to get it fully into gear. My car always had this in sixth, but the short-shifter exacerbated it. So unlike the other gears where you can almost just knock the shifter towards the gear you want and it'll pull itself into gear, sixth gear requires an intent to pull the shifter into gear and follow through with the motion the entire way.

Does this change the shifter position like the Boomba adapter? No; the shifter remains in the exact same position, except the throw is physically shorter.

Was it worth it? I'm not sure; the mod did exactly what it claimed and it did it well, but the shifter is already so good in this car, I'm not sure the time I spent was worth bothering with it. Instead of being a night-and-day change like in some cars, it's almost a personal taste--which do you prefer, stock or modded, because neither could be objectively defined as better than the other.

One thing I can say for certain though, is that if you're going to do the shorter-shifter, do both bushings as well--no questions about it. I did an initial test-drive after installing the shorter-shifter and base bushings, but before I installed the cable bushings, so I could get a baseline for improvements made by the cable bushings. Without them, the shifting was noticeably more clunky than stock and I can actively say I wasn't thrilled. After installing the cable bushings, the shifter noticeably smoothed up.

I do also have some thoughts on the installation, as I ran into a few different things. The first thing I encountered is that my shifter assembly was smothered in white lithium grease from the factory. We're talking dripping off, splattering everywhere as I took the assembly out. Enough that I actually had to wipe it off to work on the shifter. To regrease, I used Sil-Glyde brake lube instead of white-lithium. It doesn't dry-out like lithium grease, and while it's noticeably more tacky to the touch instead of slick, parts greased with it will slide and rotate effortlessly. I use this stuff on my cars, my guns, my tools. Plus, it's safe on all materials (including rubber and plastics).

One thing I'd like to bring up, is that installing the cable bushings was dead simple. I think it only took me a half-hour, and it wasn't a fiddly job at all. I like working on cars, I just don't like fiddly work. The shift assembly is nothing but fiddly work. All the interior trim pieces require lots of care not to break or scratch anything; parts are oddly shaped so they're hard to move about without smacking other stuff in the car, and overall I just did not enjoy doing the short-shifter or base bushings.

Which brings me to my last point. JBR says to remove the teflon bushing from the pivot-ball on the bottom of the shifter arm, by grabbing it directly with pliers and pulling it off. I can tell you that doesn't work and you will never get it off without completely destroying it. I marred up both the metal ball and the bushing pretty badly before I figured out a way to actually pull it off. Luckily the metal pivot-ball on the shifter arm is no longer used, as the short-shift adapter slides over it and provides a new ball to produce the short-shift. The bushing looked pretty beat up, but a quick sanding with some very fine sandpaper and a go-over with a "non-scratch" scotch-brite sponge, returned it to a usable smooth condition.

The proper (and only way) to remove the bushing without wrecking it, is to pry it off using needle-nose pliers. Get the pliers underneath each side of the bushing, wedge the nose of the pliers against the molded plastic of the shifter base, and pry up to pop it off.

Room Auto part Plastic Fictional character


Since we're already on the subject of ignoring part of their instructions, also ignore where they tell you to pry the center console opening apart and pull the shifter assembly out through the hole, since it won't fit normally. This is dumb and terrible advice--it's just a good way to waste time and break things. Just take the extra 10 minutes to properly remove the center console. It's only a few extra screws and some bolts. The Boomba short-shift and bushing instructions show you how to properly remove the console, although I wouldn't buy their short-shift adapter.
 

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I like mine. If you can get into gear 30% shorter then you can get into gear 30% faster. That does make a difference. Best one out there so far, IMO.

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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I like mine. If you can get into gear 30% shorter then you can get into gear 30% faster. That does make a difference. Best one out there so far, IMO.

Best regards,

-Mike
I don't know it's quite as simple as that. A bunch of short shifter kits end up increasing the effort to go into gear because everything becomes stiffer. Your statement only really works if you're not wasting time having to push through notchiness that wasn't there before. If your shifting technique has really made your shifts 30% faster, good for you; I just know enough people that decided that the added harshness, noise, and notchiness of the short shifter wasn't worth the reduced throw.

The OP even mentions how 6th became even harder to shift into. Not 30% faster there. Good thing it's 6th, and not 2nd or 3rd, but still, if your VN is your daily and there's highway driving involved, having it be harder to get into 6th could make for an unpleasant experience.

My point is YMMV. I'm glad you like yours and I'm sure there's plenty others that do, too, but it's not quite the magic pill you make it sound like.
 

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I never said it was the magic pill. My sixth gear was the same as it was before, sometimes notchy, sometimes not. All other gears are the same for me as before just shorter. I do an equal amount of highway and city. Is that better?

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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Also, Samantha did a GREAT review. I cannot stress that enough! That does NOT mean her review applies to everyone else that has the JBR short shifter. Just saying....

Br,

-Mike
 

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Sure, that's totally fine. I only took issue with "if it's 30% shorter it's 30% faster", which although it may apply to you, doesn't work out that way for everyone. Thankfully we have amazing threads like this to give extensive, honest reviews, and installation advice, so that people know what they're potentially getting into, and it is reversible (from what I understand) if you take OP's lessons and avoid some of the mistakes he had to make for our sake.
 

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I didn't run into any problems. I found install pretty easy. I didn't do the transmission bushings though. I only did the shifter base bushings and the short shifter itself. IDK, maybe that makes it less notchy? Just a guess.... I think this is a great set-up, especially if you track the car. Faster lap times for sure and makes it a lot more fun to drive if that's even possible. Of course, this is just my experience.

Br,

-Mike
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So after 3 months (and 4k miles) of having the short-shifter installed, I can say that it has smoothed out and I finally fully enjoy it. This probably has a lot to do with the transmission itself finally starting to break in (I'm just shy of 12k miles, and I'm going to do a trans-fluid change right at 12k), but the short-shifter feels like it's a natural part of the car and not an aftermarket change like it did before. Mainly because no car manufacturer would ever let a shifter feel that clunky in certain gears.
 

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2019 Veloster N PP / MT / Perf Blue.
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I just got back from a test-drive after installing a JBR short-shifter and both solid bushing sets (shifter base & trans cable bracket), and I have some thoughts on the mod itself, as well as the installation.

Does it actually shorten the throws? Yes; it's noticeably shorter without the vagueness you normally get in a short-shifter.

Is shifting more positive? Yes; there is no slop, and the mechanism physically feels heavier to move around. Shifting is now heavy enough, it makes me wish the shifter knob was weighted.

Were they any negatives? Sixth gear has a noticeable notch you need to push past to get it fully into gear. My car always had this in sixth, but the short-shifter exacerbated it. So unlike the other gears where you can almost just knock the shifter towards the gear you want and it'll pull itself into gear, sixth gear requires an intent to pull the shifter into gear and follow through with the motion the entire way.

Does this change the shifter position like the Boomba adapter? No; the shifter remains in the exact same position, except the throw is physically shorter.

Was it worth it? I'm not sure; the mod did exactly what it claimed and it did it well, but the shifter is already so good in this car, I'm not sure the time I spent was worth bothering with it. Instead of being a night-and-day change like in some cars, it's almost a personal taste--which do you prefer, stock or modded, because neither could be objectively defined as better than the other.

One thing I can say for certain though, is that if you're going to do the shorter-shifter, do both bushings as well--no questions about it. I did an initial test-drive after installing the shorter-shifter and base bushings, but before I installed the cable bushings, so I could get a baseline for improvements made by the cable bushings. Without them, the shifting was noticeably more clunky than stock and I can actively say I wasn't thrilled. After installing the cable bushings, the shifter noticeably smoothed up.

I do also have some thoughts on the installation, as I ran into a few different things. The first thing I encountered is that my shifter assembly was smothered in white lithium grease from the factory. We're talking dripping off, splattering everywhere as I took the assembly out. Enough that I actually had to wipe it off to work on the shifter. To regrease, I used Sil-Glyde brake lube instead of white-lithium. It doesn't dry-out like lithium grease, and while it's noticeably more tacky to the touch instead of slick, parts greased with it will slide and rotate effortlessly. I use this stuff on my cars, my guns, my tools. Plus, it's safe on all materials (including rubber and plastics).

One thing I'd like to bring up, is that installing the cable bushings was dead simple. I think it only took me a half-hour, and it wasn't a fiddly job at all. I like working on cars, I just don't like fiddly work. The shift assembly is nothing but fiddly work. All the interior trim pieces require lots of care not to break or scratch anything; parts are oddly shaped so they're hard to move about without smacking other stuff in the car, and overall I just did not enjoy doing the short-shifter or base bushings.

Which brings me to my last point. JBR says to remove the teflon bushing from the pivot-ball on the bottom of the shifter arm, by grabbing it directly with pliers and pulling it off. I can tell you that doesn't work and you will never get it off without completely destroying it. I marred up both the metal ball and the bushing pretty badly before I figured out a way to actually pull it off. Luckily the metal pivot-ball on the shifter arm is no longer used, as the short-shift adapter slides over it and provides a new ball to produce the short-shift. The bushing looked pretty beat up, but a quick sanding with some very fine sandpaper and a go-over with a "non-scratch" scotch-brite sponge, returned it to a usable smooth condition.

The proper (and only way) to remove the bushing without wrecking it, is to pry it off using needle-nose pliers. Get the pliers underneath each side of the bushing, wedge the nose of the pliers against the molded plastic of the shifter base, and pry up to pop it off.

View attachment 3850

Since we're already on the subject of ignoring part of their instructions, also ignore where they tell you to pry the center console opening apart and pull the shifter assembly out through the hole, since it won't fit normally. This is dumb and terrible advice--it's just a good way to waste time and break things. Just take the extra 10 minutes to properly remove the center console. It's only a few extra screws and some bolts. The Boomba short-shift and bushing instructions show you how to properly remove the console, although I wouldn't buy their short-shift adapter.
Amazing review - thank you for your time and effort. This is a wonderful review!

-JE
 

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I don't know it's quite as simple as that. A bunch of short shifter kits end up increasing the effort to go into gear because everything becomes stiffer. Your statement only really works if you're not wasting time having to push through notchiness that wasn't there before. If your shifting technique has really made your shifts 30% faster, good for you; I just know enough people that decided that the added harshness, noise, and notchiness of the short shifter wasn't worth the reduced throw.

The OP even mentions how 6th became even harder to shift into. Not 30% faster there. Good thing it's 6th, and not 2nd or 3rd, but still, if your VN is your daily and there's highway driving involved, having it be harder to get into 6th could make for an unpleasant experience.

My point is YMMV. I'm glad you like yours and I'm sure there's plenty others that do, too, but it's not quite the magic pill you make it sound like.
Linkage cable adjustment is the key to any of the kits installation. If they aren't adjust appropriately, there will be engagement issues depending upon the cable gear control.
 
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