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I've asked three people from 3 different Hyundai dealerships why Canadians get ripped off regarding the 5 vs 10 year powertrain warranties, and not one person at any of the dealerships could give me a reason why there is such a large difference between the two countries warranties.
All I could think of is either it has something to do with different Automotive competition in the two countries, or maybe Canadians tend to keep their cars longer, vs Americans who tend to change vehicles more often, so a long warranty offered to Americans would be irrelevant, and not used.
Any ideas?
America has pretty strong consumer protection laws and it is called "America's Best Warranty" it was likely introduced back in the late 90s to help establish a market holding. It seems as though they were in canada one year before entering the US market. Could have been a make or break moment to try and boost sales in US. thats my thoughts
 

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2020 Manual Performance Blue N, stock. PPF on front.
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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
View attachment 4714

this is right off Hyundai Canada's website - if failure due to connecting rod bearing damage . 80CA08 recall number KSDS software update
I take it most of the unreliability of the GDI engines has to do with the connecting rod bearing?
What is "80CA08 recall number KSDS software update?"
I haven't received any recall notices on my 2020 N.
 

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I take it most of the unreliability of the GDI engines has to do with the connecting rod bearing?
What is "80CA08 recall number KSDS software update?"
I haven't received any recall notices on my 2020 N.
It might not apply for the 2020 model , I could check with your vin # ... KSDS in the knock sensor detection system . the update enhances the software / operation of the knock sensor .
 

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A little late here, but can we all agree this isn't old news. And it's surely not about millings being left behind in the manufacturing process one time in 2010. Hyundai is lying about the issues, and seemingly refuses to fix the real issue. Independent inspections of affected vehicles determined there were several issues from faulty HPFP parts, faulty electronics, fuel rail issues, and even engine blocks blowing holes that dump oil onto the exhaust. We're talking 10 years worth of recalls. That's enough time to diagnose and fix their design/parts.

I agree that the issue of engines just popping for no "apparent" reason (LSPI) has been pretty well buttoned up. But the engine fires still going on is not very exciting to hear. Just yesterday Hyundai/KIA extended the recall to include more cars. It's up to 5.6M vehicles ranging all the way up to 2019, my guess is that the recall will go on with time, meaning next year the 2020s will be included, then the year after that, the 2021s will be included. MANY thousands of cars have burst into flames while driving, and people have been killed because they couldn't stop their flaming car in time to get out because the brakes also failed.

I personally am not too concerned about my car catching on fire, because to me, it's just metal that can be replaced, and I am perfectly capable of stopping a car without brakes in a life and death situation. And even though it has been many thousands of cars that have been destroyed, they have sold millions of cars over the same timeframe, so the percentage is relatively low (although anything more than 1 car bursting into flames should be concerning). But it irritates me that Hyundai won't take the steps to fix the issues, rather they seem like they're lying and hiding something. From all of the cases I've read about, the #1 most common issue seems to be related to the HPFP leaking from either the unit or the connectors. And then some people who had warranty work done, the "fix" seemed to damage the fuel rail which then causes that to leak and catch fire instead.

It reminds me of the GM ignitions switches that were failing and killing people. Instead of replacing them with better quality parts, they just changed the part number to try and hide the issue from auditors.
 

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Yes, they were lying and got caught. One of their own engineers stepped up and testified against them in Congress and the NHTSA. This is where it all started.👍🇺🇸
Now that you mention it, I do remember hearing that. And after looking it up again, turns out it was 6 years ago. Yet the issues still remain. It disappoints me.
 

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It is but be thankful you have a warranty that addresses it, thanks to the NHTSA. Sometimes government agencies can work for you. You don’t need to let it disappoint you. Just take it in stride, do what you need to do and know that the truth has been made known.👍🇺🇸
 

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Chalk White 2020 Veloster N w/PP
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Also, consider that most of us will not be affected at all. I am not defending Hyundai or anybody else, but over the last few years a lot of changes have been made to our vehicles. For example, more small turbo engines, GDI and struggles between better mileage and power. Of course there is always balancing cost with features. Now everybody is jumping on the electric bandwagon. Expect problems...lots of them.

I remember the days of the 12 month / 12k warranty. After that, you were on your own. I was ecstatic when my Mitsubishi-built Stealth R/T had a 36 month / 36k warranty. I remember a couple of leds went out on the third brake light on my wing. I had like 35,800 miles on the car. Got a new one installed under warranty.
 
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Today, my wife said to me that I should trade my VN for a new RM20 when they come out. The prior discussion was my life insurance. Related?
 

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2022 Golf R DSG, 2002 Sentra SER Spec-V
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I'd say that yes you should have bought an Elantra N instead. You're getting a lot more for your money over the VN and it cost less than VN. You're also not buying a discontinued out of date car that only about 2500 people in the N.A want.
 

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I'd say that yes you should have bought an Elantra N instead. You're getting a lot more for your money over the VN and it cost less than VN. You're also not buying a discontinued out of date car that only about 2500 people in the N.A want.
Same engine, same issues. The Elantra N utilizes the; 2.0T Theta II, so does the Kona N, as well as the VN. Tune is a little different, along with the turbocharger, everything else is the same.👍🇺🇸
 

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The N engines differ greatly from regular Theta II, sharing very little with their pedestrian counterparts. The N engines are called Theta II-i. The VN is also assembled entirely in Ulsan, South Korea.


While it sucks that the regular Theta II engines are failing at great numbers, it's nice to know that Hyundai gave the N engines a little more TLC. I've read that the engine recalls were due to milling shavings not being removed and cleaned off before assembly. And the problem engines mostly originate from those assembled in US plants. I'm not worried about it at all on my VN. The N engine, despite being based on a rather tame economy motor appears to be rather well built for what it is. The cooling system alone is worth mentioning. There aren't too many cars in any price range that can handle five 20 minute sessions on track without overheating or suffering debilitating heat soak. I foresee the VN being a track day toy of choice for people on a budget in the future because it already has a great foundation. It's well engineered and overbuilt, which is very rare to see nowadays.
 

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Understand, this is old news which has been delineated more than once before. When we talk about the Theta II, we are speaking specifically about this variation. We have, since the inception of the VN.

The issue at hand still remains the same, the engine block and Hyundai’s block casting and milling technique, rather in Korea or in the US. They all use the same block, there is no difference in the long block or short blocks.

This why the 2019 previously and now the 2020 has been included as part of the original federal NHTSA lawsuit. The left over millings breaking off, end up in the crankcase, ultimately causing bearing failure. This is not going to change.

Hyundai simply introduced upgraded knock detection software and touted it as a fix. The issue still remains, however they extended the warranty to a lifetime engine warranty for the original owner in the US. We also have the option of a 10 year bumper to bumper warranty.

This descendant of the Theta II has little in common with its predecessors, “other than the fact that it has an all-aluminum long-block, open deck, and 86x86mm bore and stroke dimensions.”
Be aware and know what causes the issue specifically. This is to your advantage not disadvantage. All this which pertains to the Motor Trend article, has been spoken about at length in various threads as far back as it’s inception in the early part of 2019.

Make sure you take the time to go back and read applicable threads and posts generated during such discussions. Some are much older and I’ve noticed of late, Vertical Scope has or is archiving or deleting much older threads.

Maybe for server space but nevertheless some of the past threads are being eliminated.👍🇺🇸
 

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I think the JD power dependability study for 2022 is indicative of how Hyundai took that lawsuit.

 

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Hyundai Motor Group receives three segment awards for the Hyundai Santa Fe, Hyundai Sonata and Kia Sorento. The 2022 U.S. Vehicle Dependability Study is based on responses from 29,487 original owners of 2019 model-year vehicles after three years of ownership. The study was fielded from July 2021 through November 2021.
Highest-Ranked Brands

Kia ranks highest overall in vehicle dependability, with a score of 145 PP100. This is the first year Kia leads the overall ranking after ranking third overall in 2021
Most dependable model: For a second consecutive year, the Porsche 911 is the highest-ranked model in the study. This is the third time in the past four years that the 911 has earned this honor, a remarkable achievement.
JD. Power reportedly charges hundreds of thousands of dollars to carmakers for access to its survey results, a large fee to mention their awards in advertisements, and has a service to help companies make improvements that should raise their rankings. The company claims that its business practices of consulting companies how to improve rankings in their awards and the fees they charge for licensing their awards for promotional purposes are separate.
In essence, automotive companies pay JD. Power for their ratings👍🇺🇸
 
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