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Anybody else get the ECU reflash recall notice in the mail? Says it will reprogram knock sensor so send it to limp mode so you can still get it to the dealer.
 

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Yeah, I received mine today as well (base N), looks like if I'm reading correctly that once installed, it will work with existing knock sensors to somehow detect rod bearing damage and if triggered will send the car into limp mode along with an engine light. My car only has 1800 miles on it and I've always been mindful not to use heavy throttle inputs at low rpm, I don't know but I read here where we shouldn't load the motor at low engine speed, whether this has anything to do with anything of this nature, I don't know. It states that it's only for the 19 N along with some other Hyundai models. I guess the folks with a lot of miles might be the ones that should be most concerned but there's probably no rhyme or reason behind it, it'd suck if I get my recall done at 1800 miles and boom, the computer is sensing rod bearing failure:(

Oh yeah, we do get another 20k mile added to the warranty but same 10yr time frame.
 

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Im at 10,800mi on mine and just hope it doesnt make the tune worse for some reason. Hopefully its just a knock sensor logic change and thats it. StageVClinger you need to drive more often. You got yours way before me and have way less miles.
 

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Im at 10,800mi on mine and just hope it doesnt make the tune worse for some reason. Hopefully its just a knock sensor logic change and thats it. StageVClinger you need to drive more often. You got yours way before me and have way less miles.
Yeah, that's my main concern as well, I certainly don't want to lose power. I know, I need to get the car out more, I have old feeble parents that I have to deal with but they're both on the mends now so I hope to be able to get it on the road more, we'll get together and go for a drive, just remember, I'm slow and old so wait on me at the turns:smile:
 

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I got mine in the mail. I am yet to do it with about 15k and extremely hard driving (I am redlining this thing almost every trip). I am not in a hurry to get it completed. I don't lug. I use 93 AKI. And one of the previous cars I owned, a BRZ, has made me weary of being the first to have a recall performed.

Has anyone actually reported issues with their N in regard to knock or knock-induced damage?

Edit - I feel like Hyundai could make the N ownership experience even better if they appointed some sort of liaison who had specific knowledge regarding the N and was able to convey this to us owners.
 

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Yeah, I received mine today as well (base N), looks like if I'm reading correctly that once installed, it will work with existing knock sensors to somehow detect rod bearing damage and if triggered will send the car into limp mode along with an engine light. My car only has 1800 miles on it and I've always been mindful not to use heavy throttle inputs at low rpm, I don't know but I read here where we shouldn't load the motor at low engine speed, whether this has anything to do with anything of this nature, I don't know. It states that it's only for the 19 N along with some other Hyundai models. I guess the folks with a lot of miles might be the ones that should be most concerned but there's probably no rhyme or reason behind it, it'd suck if I get my recall done at 1800 miles and boom, the computer is sensing rod bearing failure:(

Oh yeah, we do get another 20k mile added to the warranty but same 10yr time frame.
The low RPM high load thing is to avoid a thing called low speed preignition (LSPI) which can crack pistons (most commonly) or break/bend rods, ruin rod bearings, break crankshaft, etc. Fuel octane is important but it's also important that it's high quality fuel (Top Tier rated if possible) and that you don't use any fuel additives that have metallic ingredients (manganese, MMT, and calcium are all common and should be avoided). Using the car hard enough to decarbon it and having recommended carbon cleaning procedures done on time are also critical. There's motor oil now that specifies it's tested to avoid LSPI and that also helps.



I think this reflash is mostly to cover Hyundai against any lawsuits and prevent upset customers though, since they had some crankshaft defects on older models of this engine that caused rod bearing failure and the oblivious drivers drove till the rod knock was so bad a rod broke through the engine block and caused a fire. I'm not sure they're anticipating failures on the newer motors, hopefully just trying to cover the few that will statistically have defects or suffer maintenance neglect. It might be partially related to LSPI failures though.
 

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It was actually millings that were left on the block after machining that has caused the failures. There millings would break off and end up in the crankcase over a period of time, causing bearing failure. Hyundai is doing a CYA is all. All of the failures were primarily surrounding the previous version of the 2.0 Theta II engine.

You can lug the engine in any gear without fear of LSPI or failure. Just make sure you are utilizing a premium fuel of 91 or greater octane.

LSPI is caused by droplets or particles in the combustion chamber, combinations of fuel and oil, that ignite prior to spark, resulting in uncontrolled, abnormal combustion. This creates spikes in engine pressure, ultimately causing internal engine damage. It's not caused from lugging the motor in a particular gear, then applying WOT doesn't caused by pre-ignition. In fact the 2.0T Theta II, produces the majority of it tq and hp at lower rpms.


Try a higher octane fuel
.....Check for loss of EGR....Keep compression within reasonable limits.....Check for over-advanced ignition timing....Check for a defective knock sensor...."Read" your spark plugs....Check for engine overheating.
 

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It was actually millings that were left on the block after machining that has caused the failures. There millings would break off and end up in the crankcase over a period of time, causing bearing failure. Hyundai is doing a CYA is all. All of the failures were primarily surrounding the previous version of the 2.0 Theta II engine.

You can lug the engine in any gear without fear of LSPI or failure. Just make sure you are utilizing a premium fuel of 91 or greater octane.

LSPI is caused by droplets or particles in the combustion chamber, combinations of fuel and oil, that ignite prior to spark, resulting in uncontrolled, abnormal combustion. This creates spikes in engine pressure, ultimately causing internal engine damage. It's not caused from lugging the motor in a particular gear, then applying WOT doesn't caused by pre-ignition. In fact the 2.0T Theta II, produces the majority of it tq and hp at lower rpms.


Try a higher octane fuel
.....Check for loss of EGR....Keep compression within reasonable limits.....Check for over-advanced ignition timing....Check for a defective knock sensor...."Read" your spark plugs....Check for engine overheating.

I'm not sure if I'm understanding you properly but are you saying that low rpm operation followed by high load (WOT) operation doesn't cause LSPI?
 

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Look for some YouTube videos on YouTube. Redvn has it all wrong. Yes, higher octane fuel helps with LSPI however.

The problem with the filings in Hyundai engines were primarily 2.4L engines from the Alabama plant between 2011-13 iirc. Look up that fiasco too.

The good thing is that the engine in our car is an evolution of an engine that's been around for a while. One reason I got a VN is that I had a GenCoupe 2.0t that had a predecessor to this engine. Great mill
 

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Look for some YouTube videos on YouTube. Redvn has it all wrong. Yes, higher octane fuel helps with LSPI however.

The problem with the filings in Hyundai engines were primarily 2.4L engines from the Alabama plant between 2011-13 iirc. Look up that fiasco too.

The good thing is that the engine in our car is an evolution of an engine that's been around for a while. One reason I got a VN is that I had a GenCoupe 2.0t that had a predecessor to this engine. Great mill
Yeah sure it is, that's why Hyundai is in a mandatory recall for the engine. Just maybe, you need to familiarize yourself more with the actual issues concerning the 2.0/T Theta II engine.

Believe what you wish and you're welcome to your uninformed opinion but this is all it is. This has been discussed in depth many times and there is countless information, regarding the issues with the 2.0 Theta II engine.

Hyundai Theta II Engine Knocking, Seizing, and Sludge - Hyundai Problems Direct quote from this website as well a countless others
https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2019/02/hyundai-raided-in-south-korea-over-theta-ii-engine-recall/
https://www.courthousenews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Hyundai.pdf
and there are countless articles on the same subject.

These are just a short few of the true articles about the recall. This is exactly why Hyundai has been ordered by NHTSA to make a Knock Sensor Detection System Software Update for the ECU in the 2.0T Theta Veloster N.:wink: You're also getting an extended engine warranty from 100K to 120K miles. You obviously didn't read your recall notice very well or understand whey!:grin:LMAO!

The Theta II is a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine that is well known for a lot of things and none of them are good. Bearing failure, metal debris riding on contaminated oil, piston ring defects, seizing, knocking, crying.
it was testified by one of their own engineers.
“On March 31, 2017, Kia Motor Americas (Hyundai) filed a Defect Information Report (DIR) recalling 618,160 MY 2011-2014 Optima, MY 2012-2014 Sorento, and MY 2011-2013 Sportage vehicles with “Theta II” engines (Recall No. 17V-224). “Theta II” engines are a family of engines used by both Kia and Hyundai Motor America (Hyundai). Kia’s DIR described the defect as an issue involving manufacturing deris as well as a machining process causing an uneven surface roughness which could restrict oil flow within the engine.
and it goes on! Hyundai lied their preverable arses off and it was so testified before the NHTSA by one of their own engineers. It has literally turned into one of the costliest recalls in automotive history for Hyundai. 3.6 billion and counting. Along with a free replacement of engine to 120K miles from 100K.
 

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I had this software update done yesterday and have noticed something on the backside of the motor (sounds like an electric pump) now runs for several minutes after shutdown. This is something I've never heard from this car before, or maybe it's just significantly louder now. Anyone else noticed the same or if a change to the programming on a turbo cooling pump or something was part of this update?
 

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I had my oil changed last week (2020, NPP) and no updates, recalls, reflashes etc.
 

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I had this software update done yesterday and have noticed something on the backside of the motor (sounds like an electric pump) now runs for several minutes after shutdown. This is something I've never heard from this car before, or maybe it's just significantly louder now. Anyone else noticed the same or if a change to the programming on a turbo cooling pump or something was part of this update?
Maybe something you're not used to be hearing. The Knock Sensors ECM Firmware Upgrade shouldn't affect anything but the sensor programming and limp mode.

You can always go back into the dealership service service and have them check it. :smile:

The recalls for the 2019 Veloster N, do not affect the 2020 model as they were corrected and inclusive at the factory.
 

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I know this was just for the knock detection but just didn't know if they lumped some other updates in. I pop the hood every time i park in the garage and this sound was never there before this dealership visit. It's very noticeable even with the hood closed, both from inside the car and out. It fills the garage with noise that can't be missed.

The only possible alternative is that this pump used to be very quiet and now is not.

Unrelated but another thing that is different is I used to clean a considerable amount of carbon off the tailpipes after every drive. Every single drive over the last 8000 miles. I've now driven the car at least a dozen times since this software update, same way I always drive, and not a single bit of anything on the tailpipes. Seems like possibly running a leaner afr?

I mean both of these observances were consistent daily from day 1 of ownership up until the drive to the dealership for this update and both have been consistently different since leaving the dealership.

If other updates are performed to improve the car are they required to note it? Probably not, I will likely bring it by to ask the question but not holding my breath they have information beyond the notice we all received.
 

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or now running at a different speed. I believe it's the electric coolant pump to cool the turbo after shut down, circulating coolant while static cools the bearing cassette to help prevent damage and oil burning (remember no oil circulates while the engine is off but the turbo still spins.)
 

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I know this was just for the knock detection but just didn't know if they lumped some other updates in. I pop the hood every time i park in the garage and this sound was never there before this dealership visit. It's very noticeable even with the hood closed, both from inside the car and out. It fills the garage with noise that can't be missed.

The only possible alternative is that this pump used to be very quiet and now is not.

Unrelated but another thing that is different is I used to clean a considerable amount of carbon off the tailpipes after every drive. Every single drive over the last 8000 miles. I've now driven the car at least a dozen times since this software update, same way I always drive, and not a single bit of anything on the tailpipes. Seems like possibly running a leaner afr?

I mean both of these observances were consistent daily from day 1 of ownership up until the drive to the dealership for this update and both have been consistently different since leaving the dealership.

If other updates are performed to improve the car are they required to note it? Probably not, I will likely bring it by to ask the question but not holding my breath they have information beyond the notice we all received.

The way to tell would be to use a scan tool to pull the ECM revision ID and see if it's any different from other people who had this recall done previously. It's not uncommon for manufacturers to make non critical updates to the firmware without a TSB or campaign. The ECM can only be updated with the most current firmware version when being flashed by the factory tool, so any recall campaign changes are rolled into any newer updates and you just get the newest one when you come in for the recall. Any changes are always accompanied by a new revision number though.
 
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