Hyundai Veloster N Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
766 Posts
They have them but they are like 750 bucks. I will wait till they make less expensive alternatives.

Br,

-Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Especially sucks that slotted and drilled rotors wear out faster that normal rotors so the price is harder to swallow 🤷‍♂️
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
766 Posts
PowerStop is supposed to make some for the N. I bet they will be out before the end of the year. IDK, the stock rotors still look like new on my car. Probably sticking with those for the time being. The thing stops on a dime as it is, imagine it with slotted or drilled rotors? Once PowerStop makes them I will probably put them on. I am the type to change it all if I have to change any of it. So if I put on performance rotors I will probably replace the brake lines, better fluid and pads while I am at it.

Br,

-Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Oh yes. They stop very well. I was just doing it for looks. But i can imagine Itll prolly throw me thre the front windshield with those slotted rotors. Hahaha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
For the best OVERALL braking performance, you want vented rotors. The drilled/slotted look awesome, but they do not give any advantage at all for street use, which is predominantly what these cars get.


If you take it to the track, slotted give some performance benefit by being able to disperse some of the gas produced during braking, but there is a small cost of braking performance due to loss of surface area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
To be honest it would not be too hard to drill your existing rotors yourself. If you look on the internet for the exact rotors for your VN (not just the companies generic picture) and expanded the size to say 50% full size. You could measure the positions and size of the holes, you know the outside diameters of the rotors and the lug nut hole size. Just make sure your holes do not hit the web stiffeners which join the two sides of the rotors together, after drilling the holes use a countersinking bit to remove the burrs/sharp edges of the hole.
A cheap drill press from Harbor Freight should do the job because the vent holes will be under 1/4 inch. I would buy a few drill bits once you decide on the hole diameter, unless you have a grinder to re-sharpen the drill bits. Need a center punch to ensure the drill bit does not wonder when you start drilling.
If you want some slots in the rotors that really needs something like a vertical milling machine. But a high speed Dremel (not sure if right spelling) and some small diameter grinding attachment/bit (about 1/8 to 3/16 inch diameter) should do the job.
Measure the total thickness of the rotors and the thickness of just one of the two rotors halves. Might not be worth going more than half the thickness of just one of the rotors. Usually there is a minimum thickness that the whole rotor should not go below, but I guess it is slightly different with vented rotors. After finish the slots use a very fine bit and polish the sides of the slots to prevent brake pad dust from sticking. Just like the vent holes remove burrs/sharp edges or they will really chew up your disc pads more than add the holes and slots will do.
The question is do you need both the holes or slots, or depending on driving do you just need one of the two options.
Email if you need another info. Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I'm sorry, but suggesting that you can just DIY drilling or slotting your own rotors (especially with tools and bits of Harbor Freight quality) is madness.

At minimum, you'd need a CNC along with the materials knowledge of feed/rpm rates using X, Y, or Z types of milling bits to know how to drill (or mill) the rotors without stressing or overheating them. Once, they are drilled and chamfered, you'll need some sort of protectorant/coating on the insides/faced areas to prevent rusting or other corrosion.

Considering that the brakes are THE biggest safety feature of a vehicle, I don't think I'd leave a process like that up to even the most experienced shade-tree mechanic...

shrugs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I'm sorry, but suggesting that you can just DIY drilling or slotting your own rotors (especially with tools and bits of Harbor Freight quality) is madness.

At minimum, you'd need a CNC along with the materials knowledge of feed/rpm rates using X, Y, or Z types of milling bits to know how to drill (or mill) the rotors without stressing or overheating them. Once, they are drilled and chamfered, you'll need some sort of protectorant/coating on the insides/faced areas to prevent rusting or other corrosion.

Considering that the brakes are THE biggest safety feature of a vehicle, I don't think I'd leave a process like that up to even the most experienced shade-tree mechanic...

shrugs
I do not think you will be stress the material at such a small drill size and no chance of work hardening the material with the amount of machining that you are carrying out. If you were machining the whole rotor I think that care is required. Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I'm sorry, but suggesting that you can just DIY drilling or slotting your own rotors (especially with tools and bits of Harbor Freight quality) is madness.

At minimum, you'd need a CNC along with the materials knowledge of feed/rpm rates using X, Y, or Z types of milling bits to know how to drill (or mill) the rotors without stressing or overheating them. Once, they are drilled and chamfered, you'll need some sort of protectorant/coating on the insides/faced areas to prevent rusting or other corrosion.

Considering that the brakes are THE biggest safety feature of a vehicle, I don't think I'd leave a process like that up to even the most experienced shade-tree mechanic...

shrugs
+1

Who knows ANYONE who has ever drilled their own rotors?



-Sam
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
766 Posts
LMAO!!! That was funny!

Br,

-Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Thinking about it, people without any engineering training or very good DIY skills and maybe do not have the confidence to use equipment should not try it.
I had a 5 year engineering apprenticeship in England, with 3 years in the workshop using the majority of metal cutting machines. Plus a lot of mechanical hands-on manufacturing experience and 40 years engineering design. So I tend to think that it is not a problem, but it would be for some people. Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Thinking about it, people without any engineering training or very good DIY skills and maybe do not have the confidence to use equipment should not try it.
I had a 5 year engineering apprenticeship in England, with 3 years in the workshop using the majority of metal cutting machines. Plus a lot of mechanical hands-on manufacturing experience and 40 years engineering design. So I tend to think that it is not a problem, but it would be for some people. Dave
So it sounds like you might have a fighting chance, but drilled rotors are difficult even for companies who manufactured them for a living which is why we say that.

No offense meant.

Sam
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
766 Posts
Dave,

I didn't mean to offend you. I just though Sam's reply was funny. I can see Randy saying that... lol....

Br,

-Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Dave,

I didn't mean to offend you. I just though Sam's reply was funny. I can see Randy saying that... lol....

Br,

-Mike
Its okay, I did not come to America until I was 48 years old. We had to have thick skins because we are not politically correct over there. After it was pointed out, I realized that I had not thought that it could be harder for some people to modify the rotors. We all have different skills sets, I was just going through the method of modifying the rotors.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top