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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

Super nooby questions ahead - I'm trying to start doing some of my own car maintenance in an attempt to learn more about cars and in hopes of getting a bit more handy with them.

Silly as it sounds, I've never swapped my own wheels. I have a set of (already mounted) summer wheels/tires on the way, and I'm planning to swap them out with the winters currently on my car, by myself.

- What all should I have in advance, in terms of tooling?

- My friend, which can probably help me out a bit, has a jack I can borrow - do I also need jack stands?
I think he normally just uses the jack for swapping out his own wheels, but I could be wrong.

- Where should I be jacking the car and where should the jack stands go (if they're necessary)? I couldn't find anything in the manual (ctrl+f).

- In terms of a torque wrench, I see a variety of options - with 1/2", 1/4", 3/8". From what I gather, 1/2" is what I should be targeting? Was thinking about picking up something like this: https://www.amazon.com/LEXIVON-2-Inch-Torque-33-9-338-9-LX-184/dp/B07MKSJ4SG . Would that work, or should I get something else?

- And lastly, what should I be torquing the lug nuts to? The manual says 79~94 lbf-ft - what exactly is recommended? Or should anywhere in that range work?

Appreciate any help/tips/advice. I've already watched a few videos, but I like being 100% sure on everything before I get started on something like this. Soon I'll be trying my hand at an oil change, so we'll see how that goes too!
 

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A lot of people who are unfamiliar with wheels don't understand that most wheels now are "hubcentric" meaning the balance and centering of the wheel on the car starts from being seated correctly on the hub. The lugnuts are simply there to hold the wheel onto the car and are not meant for balance or centering. Make sure that the new wheel hubs are the same or greater than the size of the OEM hub on the car. You then purchase "hubcentric rings" that are adapters that make up the difference between the OEM hub size and the new wheel hub size. This allows the larger hub hole on the new rims to seat correctly against the smaller OEM hub. Hubcentric rings are normally available in both plastic and aluminum. I've heard people recommend both types for different reasons. I'm sure someone on here will be able to comment on that.
5010


Good luck!


-Sam
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A lot of people who are unfamiliar with wheels don't understand that most wheels now are "hubcentric" meaning the balance and centering of the wheel on the car starts from being seated correctly on the hub. The lugnuts are simply there to hold the wheel onto the car and are not meant for balance or centering. Make sure that the new wheel hubs are the same or greater than the size of the OEM hub on the car. You then purchase "hubcentric rings" that are adapters that make up the difference between the OEM hub size and the new wheel hub size. This allows the larger hub hole on the new rims to seat correctly against the smaller OEM hub. Hubcentric rings are normally available in both plastic and aluminum. I've heard people recommend both types for different reasons. I'm sure someone on here will be able to comment on that.
View attachment 5010

Good luck!


-Sam
Thanks for the info - the wheels are coming with plastic centering rings already mounted, and I ordered a set of metal ones in case I want to make the swap. Should be fine on that front, I think!
 

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More tips (assuming you are actually a "noob"):

  • Use a wrench to break the lug nuts loose from the wheel BEFORE jacking up the car (otherwise the wheel may rotate).
  • Recommend using a 1/2" wrench. You can also pick up a 1/2" breaker bar for cheap at Harbor Freight to help break lug nuts loose.
  • If you don't have a breaker bar, you can often pick up a pipe from Lowes or Home Depot that is just larger than your wrench handle. Slide it onto your wrench and you now have a long breaker bar!
  • Don't use your torque wrench for breaking the lug nuts loose.
  • Don't forget to loosen your torque wrench before storing (don't store it with it set to 100 foot pounds)
  • Tighten / loosen bolts in a star pattern a little at a time.

PS. Be careful with wheels with hubcentric rings. One trip to your local Discount Tire or other tire vendor will often result in lost rings. You'll wonder why you have vibration in the wheel and you won't know they're gone unless you remove the wheel yourself.


-Sam
 

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You can easily do one side at a time. For tires-only I rely on my jack. Any time I crawl underneath I use jack stands. Nobody will ever tell you not to put jack stands under your car when swapping tires. It is added safety. I use an electric torque wrench to remove the tires. I am getting old... I always put them on and torque by hand. The advice above is all excellent.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Great, thank you for the tips.

What torque do you all suggest for the lug nuts? The manual provides a pretty large range of 79-94 lbs/ft - is there a sweet spot?

Other than jack/jack stands, a torque wrench, and a breaker bar, anything else I might need? Or is that all of the tooling?
 

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Hopping into your thread here.. Are there issues or common solutions with tire pressure sensors when you change the wheels? That's one concern I have if I were to get a set of winter wheels and tires. Constant warning lights is ALL we need.
 

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The car will recognize the new sensors after driving a few miles. I have had NO issues with my after market wheels.

Also, I torque my wheels around 95 to 100 ft. lbs. and call it a day. Never had any problems.

Hope this helps?

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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The car will recognize the new sensors after driving a few miles. I have had NO issues with my after market wheels.

Also, I torque my wheels around 95 to 100 ft. lbs. and call it a day. Never had any problems.

Hope this helps?

Best regards,

-Mike
wow! So are you saying wheels COME WITH new sensors? I havent changed a set of wheels since 2005
 

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No, you have to install new sensors when you get new tires put on but the car can recognize them. I have new TPMS sensors & tires on my after market wheels and left the old sensors on my old rims. Car had no problem seeing the new sensors.

Br,

-Mike
 

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No, you have to install new sensors when you get new tires put on but the car can recognize them. I have new TPMS sensors & tires on my after market wheels and left the old sensors on my old rims. Car had no problem seeing the new sensors.

Br,

-Mike
Oh this is good news, I think. If they are interchangeable I'd guess the price is less So many sensors now since I last worked on my own car.
 

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Oh this is good news, I think. If they are interchangeable I'd guess the price is less So many sensors now since I last worked on my own car.
If you pull the TPMS sensors off of your stock wheels and have them put on your new wheels, you normally still have to pay for a "rebuild kit" because some of the parts are considered single use and you're not supposed to swap them over. It's a little bit less than buying new sensors with the wheels, but if you plan on swapping back and forth between your OEM wheels and the new ones you'll want to also buy TPMS sensors along with the new wheels.

I normally torque to about 100lbs/ft for wheels. The torque specs are specific to the wheels, so there's no single answer. 100lbs/ft is usually a generic answer for me.


-Sam
 

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Also, don't forget that new lug nuts need to match your wheels. The bottom part of the lug nut is shaped to fit the wheel so make sure your lug nuts match your aftermarket wheels.

5021




I normally go with the thinner lug nuts that come with a thin wall socket. This keeps them away from your rims and are less likely to scratch the wheels when tightening/removing them (in theory):

5022


-Sam
 

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I have those same exact ones only in chrome to break up the black wheels a bit. They work great.

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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For the good of the group. My Genesis Coupe came from the factory torqued to around 35 lbs and so did our Elantra GT. Both times when I went to do a tire rotation I found the lug nuts to be snug...and then checked the actual torque Never caused a problem, but I do not use a torque wrench, but torque by hand with a breaker bar. I figure I am around 75 - 90 lbs. I have never had a wheel fly off in nearly 62 years so I am good.
 
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