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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On N-Cars.net there is a thread about additional negative camber on the DCT models. Does anyone happen to know how Hyundai achieved it: camber bolts, knuckle, mount, something else?

Seems like an OEM solution for additional negative camber might be attractive for mild track and/or autocross use. Or, if it’s the knuckle or mount, that plus camber bolts might attain a lot of negative camber for more serious track use.

Normally I’d just search the parts catalog to discern the difference, but I can’t find any 2021 catalogs online yet.
 

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DCTs have extra negative camber to compensate for the additional weight of the car. This allows the car to handle similarly to MTs in corners when tracked. I think that DCTs might also have a stiffer strut bar to counter the extra body roll of the additional weight when cornering. Can anyone else confirm this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Dusk. Yes, I’m aware of why Hyundai made the change. Just trying to figure out what they did to make the change.
 

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I'm going to guess they changed the positioning of the top hole on the strut to add angle. This would be cheaper than changing the casting for the knuckle. They may have also used different strut mounts that are positioned differently. I doubt they simply added camber adjustable bolts, someone will have to disassemble their DCT to find out
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm going to guess they changed the positioning of the top hole on the strut to add angle. This would be cheaper than changing the casting for the knuckle. They may have also used different strut mounts that are positioned differently. I doubt they simply added camber adjustable bolts, someone will have to disassemble their DCT to find out
I’m hoping parts diagrams will tell what’s been changed.
 

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There's no bolts and this has been confirmed by a fellow autoxer. He drives a manual but a DCT driver showed up to one of the events he went to and he got the chance to check. So it would just be a change to the knuckle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There's no bolts and this has been confirmed by a fellow autoxer. He drives a manual but a DCT driver showed up to one of the events he went to and he got the chance to check. So it would just be a change to the knuckle.
Good to know. I was betting on a revised strut mount. Will be interesting to compare part numbers.
 

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Do we 100% know that the camber had been changed? I'm thinking that the 100 pounds difference from the DC/MT is not going to need camber adjustment. I could be wrong. What is the camber now? Don't they not run - camber on street cares from the manufacturers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Do we 100% know that the camber had been changed? I'm thinking that the 100 pounds difference from the DC/MT is not going to need camber adjustment. I could be wrong. What is the camber now? Don't they not run - camber on street cares from the manufacturers?
From Hyundai’s website the 2021 DCT model is 141 lbs heavier than the manual 2021 model. Several reviews from the press launch stated there was additional negative camber on the DCT model, with it set at about -1.7° if I remember correctly. And yes, nearly all modern cars spec a range of negative camber front and rear.
 

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From Hyundai’s website the 2021 DCT model is 141 lbs heavier than the manual 2021 model. Several reviews from the press launch stated there was additional negative camber on the DCT model, with it set at about -1.7° if I remember correctly. And yes, nearly all modern cars spec a range of negative camber front and rear.
Cool, was wundering, Wow that good amount camber, what does 2019/2020 have? Wouldn't that ware your tires hard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cool, was wundering, Wow that good amount camber, what does 2019/2020 have? Wouldn't that ware your tires hard?
Good question. I haven’t looked at the spec sheet in a while but I believe something around -0.5° or so. Incorrect toe will wear your tires much more quickly than aggressive negative camber. With that said, if you’ve got a lot of negative camber on a street car that sees mostly only highway miles then you will see accelerated wear on the inside of the tires.
 

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Good question. I haven’t looked at the spec sheet in a while but I believe something around -0.5° or so. Incorrect toe will wear your tires much more quickly than aggressive negative camber. With that said, if you’ve got a lot of negative camber on a street car that sees mostly only highway miles then you will see accelerated wear on the inside of the tires.
Cool thank you for the information.
 

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There's no bolts and this has been confirmed by a fellow autoxer. He drives a manual but a DCT driver showed up to one of the events he went to and he got the chance to check. So it would just be a change to the knuckle.
I'll wait until I can see it first hand instead of the typical he/she said second hand information. Just takes a trip to the dealership to find out.
Good question. I haven’t looked at the spec sheet in a while but I believe something around -0.5° or so. Incorrect toe will wear your tires much more quickly than aggressive negative camber. With that said, if you’ve got a lot of negative camber on a street car that sees mostly only highway miles then you will see accelerated wear on the inside of the tires.
-1 to 1.5 degrees is all anyone needs for a street/ autoX or occasional track car. The VN's rear suspension isn't setup to take advantage of anything more. The rear suspension needs the addition of; Rear Upper Camber Arms & Rear Toe Links with Eccentric Lockouts Hyundai Veloster N or Rear Toe Links Hyundai Veloster N , along with the Eccentric Lockout Kit Hyundai Veloster N to take advantage of anything more.

Both the front and rear of the car needs to be addressed for proper ride height as well. There's quite a bit more to deal with then just adding camber to the front beyond -1 degree camber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
For someone who daily drives the car and does a few track days a year or some autocross, increased negative camber up front will yield the most immediate benefit. But for sure you can go all out if you want to.
 

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For someone who daily drives the car and does a few track days a year or some autocross, increased negative camber up front will yield the most immediate benefit. But for sure you can go all out if you want to.
Changing camber on just the front end, is not beneficial to the balance of the car or proper ride height. When you make changes to the front suspension, the rear must correspond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Changing camber on just the front end, is not beneficial to the balance of the car or proper ride height. When you make changes to the front suspension, the rear must correspond.
I’m no engineer that’s for sure! In my admittedly relatively low level of experience, additional negative static camber on a strut-based front wheel drive front end is very beneficial, especially on a multi link rear end where there is decent camber gain with wheel travel.
 

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I’m no engineer that’s for sure! In my admittedly relatively low level of experience, additional negative static camber on a strut-based front wheel drive front end is very beneficial, especially on a multi link rear end where there is decent camber gain with wheel travel.
Both front and rear adjustments need to correspond to attain or maintain the correct balance of the chassis as not to cause excessive understeer/oversteer issues. Corresponding changes to sway/roll bars need to be made as well. As the body rolls, it changes the angle of camber to right or left.

There is a optimal amount of camber for each application and chassis, multi-link or MacPherson. The temp variation across the tire contact patch determines the optimal amount. If the inside is exceedingly hot and wearing faster than the outside, there is too much negative camber. When this is present with front wheels, it causes diminished braking capability, poor turn-in and pronounced mid-corner understeer. So, you just don't apply camber without making other critical adjustment of the suspension.

For cars with a multilink/unequal length A-arm setup, the shock/strut doesn't directly control camber. To change the camber with these suspension setups, there or two possible ways to adjust. First, the mounting points of one control arm need to be moved. This is accomplished on factory suspensions by rotating an eccentric bolt that carries the control-arm-to-chassis mounting points. Second, the length of one (or both) of the control arms need to changed. Be warned, altering the length of either of the control arms will significantly affect camber gain during suspension travel in addition to static camber. Keep in mind; " that every change in setting in your car’s suspension effects every other suspension setting."

If the car isn't equipped with adjustable upper control arms or upper control arm mounts from the factory and neither is there an aftermarket adjustable upper control arm, shims can be used behind the control-arm-to-chassis mounting point to adjust the camber, often seen in older vehicles.

Like I said above, there's far more to just adding camber and expecting the chassis to behave well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When someone finds out for sure what Hyundai did to change the front camber, please update this thread. I’ll call the local Hyundai dealer when I get a chance and try to compare some part numbers. Thanks!
 

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When someone finds out for sure what Hyundai did to change the front camber, please update this thread. I’ll call the local Hyundai dealer when I get a chance and try to compare some part numbers. Thanks!
I just took a look this morning. At a quick glance the DCT has different numbers for the: Knuckle, Wheel hub assy, strut top hat, strut assy, and brake dust shields but it has the same numbers for lower control arms and strut to knuckle bolts (which means they did not just add camber bolts). It looks like they fundamentally changed the front knuckle and strut design to incorporate the camber.

The MT Veloster N has a parts suffix of K9000 and the DCT has K9600. For example the RH knuckle for the MT is 51711-K9000, the DCT is 51711-K9600
 
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