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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for others input on this...

To make this short, I just got my first oil change done at the dealership, and on my way out, I noticed on the receipt that they used Quaker State conventional 5-30 oil.
I returned, and was assured by the gentleman that conventional oil was ok, even though I was certain that it should have full Synthetic...
After checking the owners manual, I didn’t notice any specific mention of synthetic, just Quaker State, but I’ve always known turbo engines to require it.


From now on, it will be full synthetic oil, and I don’t go long between oil changes, maybe 2500-3000 miles on this one at most, but should I be worried at all?
 

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I don't think one oil change is going to make or break the car. Also, if the manual doesn't specifically mention synthetic than the car doesn't NEED it. Yes, like you said I would advise against only using conventional, but unless someone else who is much more knowledgeable than I am has a reason to worry, I wouldn't be too worried.
 

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Yeah, I would not be worried either. You might just get a better seating of rings before going full synthetic. Does anyone know for sure what type of oil comes with the car as new?
 

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I wouldn't be worried either. I went full synthetic at 3200 miles. I gave the car that amount of mileage for break in. Some people on here only went 500 miles before the switch. Amsoil Signature Series works excellent in this car. Runs much, much smoother and doesn't leave any residue in the turbo or turbo shaft. Plus, this oil is either 1st or 2nd in every single test thrown at it. And it is Dexos 2 compatible. The Dexos test makes the oil manufacturer run 100 tests to see if there is low ignition pre-detonation, they are allowed 13 failures out of 100 and Amsoil SS had none. Low ignition pre-detonation is from oil sticking to the valves because we have a direct injection engine. The oil you use is extremely important to prevent this. Don't sweat it man, it's under warranty anyway. LOL...

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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I meant low speed pre ignition, not low ignition pre detonation. lol... Sometimes my old brain takes one big giant fart for itself... :)

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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The default service from my dealer is a Synthetic Blend and a tire rotation. Told them I don't need the tire rotation and to put in full synthetic. They put in QS 5W30.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the responses.
I won’t worry to much about it than, I was just a little surprised they put conventional in it I guess.
 

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Hyundai recommends and utilizes a Synthetic Blend normally. Just make sure whatever synthetic you utilize is a true (non-hydrocracked) PAO-based (Group IV) or ester-based (Group V) full synthetic oil.

ie; AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30 or Red Line 5W-30, Pennzoil Ultra Platinum and Quaker State Ultimate as well.
 

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I ended up using the Amsoil Signature Series, 0W30 and a genuine Hyundai filter. Seems to work great. I will change it on 5000 mile intervals. Probably overkill, but it just makes me feel better.

Best regards,

-Mike
 

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While not technically ideal, no real issues using conventional oil, especially if the dealership did the service. Will be difficult for Hyundai to deny any warranty work if their licensed dealership did all the maintenance work on the car and you have receipts.


That said, I've owned several turbos over the years, starting with a 1985 Mercury Cougar XR-7 that had the 2.3 SOHC Turbo under the hood. For the time, it was a great engine, very reliable (car had 176K having never been rebuilt when I bought it) and I sold it at 250K still running great.



The trick to turbos is not shut them down right away, or drive hard right away. Letting the engine warm up is a no brainer, but lots of folks just drive the **** out of them and then shut them off. While synthetic oils resist coking much better than conventional oil, that amount of heat soaking into the oil can be a bad thing.


So, the simplest thing to do is, if driving it hard, let the engine idle for a good minute to get the hotter oil flushed out of the turbo lines. Even if not driving hard, a 30 sec cool down is always a good idea. Minimal amount of fuel wasted, and it can preserve the turbo.


Other things I did on the earlier turbo cars was when switching grades of oil (ran 20w50 summer which was in the manual as acceptable, and 10w40 winter in that particular car) I would drain half a quart or so, and pour in a half quart of plain old ATF into the crankcase and let the engine idle for 10-15 minutes to circulate. The ATF has much higher detergent properties than 1990's era conventional oils did.



I don't think this is needed with modern oils, or when using quality synthetic, as they have much better cleaning properties than 30 year old conventional oils do.


All that said, your conventional oil change won't hurt anything. You can ask for synthetic at next oil change. There will probably be an up charge, but that's minimal.
 

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"Woodman" you are totally correct in what you suggest in the statement below. I have read many articles referring to the "Half-life of a Turbo". So, doing what you suggest is a good rule to follow.






"The trick to turbos is not shut them down right away, or drive hard right away. Letting the engine warm up is a no brainer, but lots of folks just drive the **** out of them and then shut them off. While synthetic oils resist coking much better than conventional oil, that amount of heat soaking into the oil can be a bad thing."
 

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"Woodman" you are totally correct in what you suggest in the statement below. I have read many articles referring to the "Half-life of a Turbo". So, doing what you suggest is a good rule to follow.






"The trick to turbos is not shut them down right away, or drive hard right away. Letting the engine warm up is a no brainer, but lots of folks just drive the **** out of them and then shut them off. While synthetic oils resist coking much better than conventional oil, that amount of heat soaking into the oil can be a bad thing."

That advice was given to me when I purchased my XR-7 used from the previous owner. Seeing as how it had 176K on the clock, had never been rebuilt, and ran like a top (I averaged 30mpg on it driving an hour to work/school every day) I heeded that advice. Further research (this was 1994 so Google wasn't quite a thing yet) and reading on care and use of turbos also pointed me in this direction. At that time, "Turbo Timers" were a popular add on to keep oil flowing after engine shutdown, but weren't strictly necessary if you let the car idle a bit.
 
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