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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title states, I would like some insight on the whiteline anti lift / caster bushing kit and how the installation is. I don't have a press, though I may get one for the installation. But if I can get around it just with some wooden blocks and a hammer, I'll go that route.

As usual, the instructions are somewhat unclear. Example, they don't mention anything about the spacers or where to place the spacer for whatever effects I want. Then again, I may be missing a page. Page 1 is the only one I got.

See pics of the kit and the instructions.
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I have them installed. I ended up taking the LCAs to BSP Motorsports and having them doing the bushings as I wasn't willing to buy a press for every once in a blue moon. I installed the anti-lift bushings upside down (on the bottom side) for more of an anti-dive affect.

Out of the many modifications I've done, the whiteline caster bushings and their spacer has been one of my favorites. Gonna box in the front LCAs in next to really tighten up the control of the front end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have them installed. I ended up taking the LCAs to BSP Motorsports and having them doing the bushings as I wasn't willing to buy a press for every once in a blue moon. I installed the anti-lift bushings upside down (on the bottom side) for more of an anti-dive affect.

Out of the many modifications I've done, the whiteline caster bushings and their spacer has been one of my favorites. Gonna box in the front LCAs in next to really tighten up the control of the front end.
How are you gonna do that? And what happens when you put spacers on top?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not gonna box them in, gonna pay someone else. :LOL:

Spacers on top creates more of an anti-lift affect, when I did the install I didn't think the car had a lift as much as it had a dive issue.
Our cars are nose heavy. 65-35, front to rear, is terrible for such a "performance car" even if it's a fwd car. I can see diving as an issue. I assume that's what you mean by "dive issue". I did get a digital copy of the instructions on their site. Odd I have to go to an Australian site to get it.
 

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From what I understand reading Whiteline's white paper on their ALK is that it actually decreases anti lift and anti dive effect when the spacer is placed on top to lower the rear arm bushing. The intend for it to be on the top, to lower the pivot point of the rear bushing. The reason they do this is the reduction to the anti's results in the suspension binding less (created a softening effect) when torque is applied to the knuckle (by the axle or brakes) to improve traction under braking and acceleration (and also as a side effect it improves ride comfort) and to help promote more even loading side to side on the front tire during turn-in and corner exit to reduce understeer. The stock anti-lift and anti-dive angles are designed to cause the suspension to stiffen via torque binding to help reduce body motions to improve driver confidence. The stock anti angles help create that "flat" or "on rails" feeling that people enjoy but that isn't always a sign of ideal suspension.

With the increased castor angle these bushings also provide it improves the camber curve so that with the increased suspension movement you're also achieving a net improvement to camber but without the negative effect the straight line traction that drastic static camber changes cause. They suggest that you can also use shock or spring adjustments to stiffen the suspension back up to counter the changes caused by the anti lift kit if the increase in body motion is too much. With our car's adjustable shocks that's a button push away.

Putting the spacer on the bottom to increase anti-lift and anti-dive would cause the suspension to feel stiffer and the car to feel more "tight" but is actually decreasing your traction under braking and acceleration. Maybe not an issue if the surface is very smooth and flat or if you're on slicks and it's loading the suspension a lot more than usual.

Link to the paper I'm referring to.. https://www.whiteline.com.au/articles/Effect of WL ALK_b.pdf
 
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